Your Parenting Decisions Matter

Christians called to abandon public education

Voddie Baucham, Jr., author of “Family Driven Faith,” noted children spend about 14,000 hours in public schools.

“Whoever controls those 14,000 hours controls our children’s worldview,” he said, citing Charles Francis Potter, a signer of the Humanist Manifesto. He wrote, “What can theistic Sunday school meeting for an hour once a week do to stem the tide of a five day program of humanist teaching?”

“The left knows that whoever controls the children owns the future. That’s why so many ’60s radicals like Bill Ayers went into education. Now they effectively control the government school system and its curriculum. But worse, we give them our children,” Shortt said.

Public Schools Have Big Impact on Evangelical Kids

Putting your Christian kids in a hard core secularist environment for 35 hours a week in school is a bad idea. Another way to put it is, letting the Assyrians of humanism train your child’s thinking will produce more Assyrians of humanism.

Children from religious, intact families fare better, study says

“An intact two-parent family and regular church attendance are each associated with fewer problem behaviors, more positive social development, and fewer parental concerns about the child’s learning and achievement,” Zill and Fletcher wrote. “Taken together, the two home-environment factors have an additive relationship with child well-being. That is, children who live in an intact family and attend religious services regularly generally come out best on child development measures, while children who do neither come out worst. Children with one factor in their favor, but not the other, fall in between ….”

What They Did Before TV – This post no longer exists

It seems almost inconceivable to believe that there was life before television. As good as the medium is for some things, it is an instrument of death to conversation in most families. Add computers, a personal CD player, and speed-eating and we’ve successfully killed off the last remnants of conversation in most families. Frankly, most families have no meaningful conversation at all. Days and weeks pass, if not months and years, without the skimpiest morsel of a good conversation. When I think about this, I almost weep for the magnitude of the loss. A mudslide of media has pushed our families into a cold ravine. We exist together for as long as we can make it, but we don’t know each other. Without face-to-face communication, the home has become an electronic desert.

 


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