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For One Sin …

For one sin …

For one sin God banished our first parents from Eden. For one sin all the posterity of Ham fell under a curse which remains over them to this day (Gen 9:21-22). For one sin Moses was excluded from Canaan, Elisha’s servant smitten with leprosy, Ananias and Sapphira cut off out of the land of the living.

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Attributes of God – AW Pink

For my one sin ……

And my other sin ……

And …….

And …….

……………………………….

…..   the sinner is only forgiven on the ground of Another having borne his punishment ………

that which His holiness demanded His grace has provided in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Attributes of God – AW Pink


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Psalm 11 – Treasury of David Commentary

I thought this might be helpful since there was some question as to my explanation of Psalm 11. Mine doesn’t compare to Spurgeon’s by any means, but it is not different in the gist.

Psalm 11

1 In the Lord I take refuge; how can you say to my soul, “Flee like a bird to your mountain,
2 for behold, the wicked bend the bow; they have fitted their arrow to the string to shoot in the dark at the upright in heart;
3 if the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?”
4 The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord’s throne is in heaven; his eyes see, his eyelids test the children of man.
5 The Lord tests the righteous, but his soul hates the wicked and the one who loves violence.
6 Let him rain coals on the wicked; fire and sulfur and a scorching wind shall be the portion of their cup.
7 For the Lord is righteous; he loves righteous deeds; the upright shall behold his face.

This is quite long because it goes verse by verse and includes several different notes from other preachers.  Well worth reading, but I’ll just give a few quotes.

“Treasury of David” – Psalm 11 by Charles H. Spurgeon

… When Satan cannot overthrow us by presumption, how craftily will he seek to ruin us by distrust! He will employ our dearest friends to argue us out of our confidence, and he will use such plausible logic, that unless we once for all assert our immovable trust in Jehovah, he will make us like the timid bird which flies to the mountain whenever danger presents itself.

“Jehovah’s throne is in the heavens;” he reigns supreme. Nothing can be done in heaven, or earth, or hell, which he doth not ordain and over-rule. He is the world’s great Emperor. Wherefore, then, should we flee? If we trust this King of kings, is not this enough? Cannot he deliver us without our cowardly retreat? Yes, blessed be the Lord our God, we can salute him as Jehovah-nissi; in his name we set up our banners, and instead of flight, we once more raise the shout of war.

Look at the black mark upon the faces of our persecutors, and we shall not run away from them. If God is in the quarrel as well as ourselves, it would be foolish to question the result, or avoid the conflict. Sodom and Gomorrah perished by a fiery hail, and by a brimstone shower from heaven; so shall all the ungodly. They may gather together like Gog and Magog to battle, but the Lord will rain upon them “an overflowing rain, and great hailstones, fire, and brimstone:” Ezekiel 38:22.

Are we tempted to put our light under a bushel, to conceal our religion from our neighbours? Is it suggested to us that there are ways of avoiding the cross, and shunning the reproach of Christ? Let us not hearken to the voice of the charmer, but seek an increase of faith, that we may wrestle with principalities and powers, and follow the Lord, fully going without the camp, bearing his reproach. Mammon, the flesh, the devil, will all whisper in our ear, “Flee as a bird to your mountain;” but let us come forth and defy them all. “Resist the devil, and he will flee from you.” There is no room or reason for retreat. Advance! Let the vanguard push on! To the front! all ye powers and passions of our soul. On! on! in God’s name, on! for “the Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge.”


We don’t have to flee from the enemy but we can stand strong with the Lord as our refuge.  Now that does not mean we take sin lightly.  There are many ways to stand firm without risking falling into sin.  (We’ll look at some ways later.)

But let the Light shine in a dark world.

Matthew 5:14-16 (ESV)
14  “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden.
15  Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house.
16 In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.

The disciples did not spread the Gospel to the world by running away, but by advancing forward with the Gospel.  Not with Conservatism.  Not with Moral Values.  Not with Political leverage.  But by sharing the Gospel with sinners.

Matthew 28:18-20 (ESV)

18 And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.
19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,
20 teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.



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Fleeing to the Lord – Psalm 11

If Sodom is all around us, even in secluded areas and our heart to some extent, how do we flee Sodom?  As I said in the post yesterday, we are to flee to the Lord.  All this time of study and just yesterday I found this Psalm.  Actually it wasn’t lost, but the meaning became clearer to me.  Notice this Psalm does not mention Sodom by name but who can miss the reference to Sodom especially in verse 6 “rain coals on the wicked; fire and sulfur and a scorching wind shall be the portion of their cup”.

Psalms 11:1-7 (ESV)

1 In the Lord I take refuge; how can you say to my soul, “Flee like a bird to your mountain,
2 for behold, the wicked bend the bow; they have fitted their arrow to the string to shoot in the dark at the upright in heart;
3 if the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?”
4 The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord’s throne is in heaven; his eyes see, his eyelids test the children of man.
5 The Lord tests the righteous, but his soul hates the wicked and the one who loves violence.
6 Let him rain coals on the wicked; fire and sulfur and a scorching wind shall be the portion of their cup.
7 For the Lord is righteous; he loves righteous deeds; the upright shall behold his face.

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Psalms 11:1 (ESV) In the Lord I take refuge; how can you say to my soul, “Flee like a bird to your mountain,

The Psalmist David is amazed that he is being advised to flee to the mountains.  His refuge is in the Lord, not in the safety of the mountains.  There is no reason to despair when we take refuge in the Lord. The Lord is on His Throne (verse 4), why should David flee?


Psalms 11:2-3 (ESV)

2 for behold, the wicked bend the bow; they have fitted their arrow to the string to shoot in the dark at the upright in heart;
3 if the foundations are destroyed, what can the righteous do?”

In verses 2-3, David’s advisers warn him that the wicked are seeking to destroy him.  The wicked have destroyed the foundations and there was nothing left that the righteous could do.  Oh, how many times have we heard that!  There is no hope, the world will only get worse, America is to far destroyed to turn back now, it is useless to witness to them, they are too far gone ….

Yet David rebukes his advisers in verse 4.


Psalms 11:4 (ESV) The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord’s throne is in heaven; his eyes see, his eyelids test the children of man.

The Lord is on His Throne and in His Temple; essentially, David is saying the Lord is still in charge.  If we today could still remember that the Lord is on His Throne and is ruling the world from there.  There is nothing to fear, the Lord is watching all.  Is not most of our fear and worry due to forgetting that the Lord is in charge of all, even the wicked for destruction? (Proverbs 16:4)

The Lord will hear His own.  But are His own crying out to Him?  (Genesis 18:20, Psalm 88:1)  It would be good to read the whole of Psalms 18, but here are some portions that apply to Psalms 11.

Psalms 18:6-17 (ESV)

6 In my distress I called upon the Lord; to my God I cried for help. From his temple he heard my voice, and my cry to him reached his ears.
7 Then the earth reeled and rocked; the foundations also of the mountains trembled and quaked, because he was angry.
8 Smoke went up from his nostrils, and devouring fire from his mouth; glowing coals flamed forth from him.

12 Out of the brightness before him hailstones and coals of fire broke through his clouds.
13 The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Most High uttered his voice, hailstones and coals of fire.

16 He sent from on high, he took me; he drew me out of many waters.
17 He rescued me from my strong enemy and from those who hated me, for they were too mighty for me.

The Lord will hear the cries of the righteous to come in judgment on the wicked and rescue the righteous.


Psalms 11:5 (ESV) The Lord tests the righteous, but his soul hates the wicked and the one who loves violence.

The Lord may test His own but He is still Sovereign and will work all things to the good of His own.  (Romans 8:28)  Yet the wicked and violent should tremble at the wrath and hate from the Lord.  Look at the punishment decreed for the wicked in verse 6.


Psalms 11:6 (ESV) Let him rain coals on the wicked; fire and sulfur and a scorching wind shall be the portion of their cup.

This is the same as what Sodom received.  The same as what will be the fate of all who reject the Lord.

Galatians 5:19-21 (ESV)

19 Now the works of the flesh are evident: sexual immorality, impurity, sensuality,
20 idolatry, sorcery, enmity, strife, jealousy, fits of anger, rivalries, dissensions, divisions,
21 envy, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these. I warn you, as I warned you before, that those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

Revelation 21:8 (ESV) But as for the cowardly, the faithless, the detestable, as for murderers, the sexually immoral, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars, their portion will be in the lake that burns with fire and sulfur, which is the second death.”


Psalms 11:7 (ESV) For the Lord is righteous; he loves righteous deeds; the upright shall behold his face.

But the Lord loves those who do righteousness, they shall see His face.

1 John 3:2 (ESV) Beloved, we are God’s children now, and what we will be has not yet appeared; but we know that when he appears we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is.

1 Corinthians 13:12 (ESV) For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known.


We aren’t to flee to the hills but to flee to the Lord.



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Ceremony Over Love

To avoid ceremonial uncleanness–the Jews did not enter the palace.” John 18:28

The religious rulers carried their pious scruples even to the palace of Pilate. Amazingly, they had no scruples about their wicked treatment of an innocent man–but they were scrupulously conscientious about matters of mere ceremonial requirement! They would not set their feet on the Gentile’s floor–for that would have defiled them! Yet meanwhile their hearts were full of evil and murderous thoughts and resolves!

There will always be people who are most punctilious in their religious rituals–but who in practical life, are little better than heathen!

We should learn well, that God is grieved more by our bitter feelings, our lack of love, our hate and envy–than He is with little omissions in religious ceremonies and formalities.

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J.R. Miller from Grace Gems

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My Favorite Quote from The Holiness of God Conference

R. C. Sproul in his session on Saturday titled A Consuming Fire: Holiness, Wrath and Justice was talking about Uzzah.

2 Sam 6:1-10
1 David again gathered all the chosen men of Israel, thirty thousand.
2 And David arose and went with all the people who were with him from Baale-judah to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who sits enthroned on the cherubim.
3 And they carried the ark of God on a new cart and brought it out of the house of Abinadab,
which was on the hill. And Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, were driving the new cart,
4 with the ark of God, and Ahio went before the ark.
5 And David and all the house of Israel were making merry before the Lord, with songs and lyres and harps and tambourines and castanets and cymbals.
6 And when they came to the threshing floor of Nacon, Uzzah put out his hand to the ark of God and took hold of it, for the oxen stumbled.
7 And the anger of the Lord was kindled against Uzzah, and God struck him down there because of his error, and he died there beside the ark of God.
8 And David was angry because the Lord had burst forth against Uzzah. And that place is called Perez-uzzah, to this day.
9 And David was afraid of the Lord that day, and he said, “How can the ark of the Lord come to me?”
10 So David was not willing to take the ark of the Lord into the city of David. But David took it aside to the house of Obed-edom the Gittite.
ESV

Sproul discussed how this story if ever mentioned is explained away and very few want to look at it seriously.

Sproul’s explanation was the best I’ve heard:

Uzzah assumed that contact with the mud would be worse than contact with his hand.

How can mud and dirt be worse than the hands of a sinful, depraved man?

Mud is cleaner and holier than we are!



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Ligonier Ministries Summaries of Conference

Ligonier Ministries also has summaries of The Holiness of God Conference sessions.

Ligonier National Conference – Ligon Duncan – Calvin and the Christian Life

Piety for Calvin was short-hand for the whole practice and faith of the Christian life. Calvin did not call his Institutes a sum of Christian theology but rather a sum of piety. Yes, Calvin’s institutes was an engagement on the truth of God’s word, but it was for the sake of producing piety.

What is meant by piety? Two things: (1) An experiential love for God as Father. And (2) a fear and reverence for Him as our Lord. The term “religion” has negative connotations for some — it conveys a formalized, external, even hypocritical life. Not so for John Calvin. For Calvin, “religion” is faith joined with fear and reverence for God. For Calvin, piety is reverence joined with the love of God which the knowledge of God’s benefits induces.

Ligonier National Conference – Steve Lawson – The Legacy of John Calvin

Calvin was the architect of reformed theology — he was the standard even in his day. Luther was a volcano, spewing out numerous fiery ideas. But Calvin was the systematizer — he arranged and ordered the theology of the Reformation. Lloyd-Jones that apart from Calvin, the Reformation would have died out by the end of the 16th century.

Ligonier National Conference – R.C. Sproul, Jr. – Train Up Your Children: Family Worship of the Holy God

But what if you’re too busy? Then stop being too busy. What is it that could possibly be more important? The transcendent God is inviting you to walk with Him in the cool of the evening. Will you say to Him: Thanks for the invitation, but I’ve got an important meeting? Nobody is too busy to draw near to the living God. Nobody is too busy to give up that which is less rewarding for the Source of all joy. Our problem is, as C.S. Lewis said, that we’re too easily pleased. We don’t properly esteem the value and the joy of what God sets before us.

Ligonier National Conference – Sinclair Ferguson (II) – Hallowed Be Your Name: The Holiness of the Father

There are two dimensions running through John’s gospel. On the one hand, we see the Eternal Son of God addressing the Father as Holy Father. What does it mean that from all eternity there has been this response of the Eternal Son to the Eternal Father such that He addresses Him as “Holy Father.” For something to be an attribute of God it must have been, in action, expressed among the three persons of the Trinity. [God expresses wrath, but strictly speaking it is not an attribute of God, because in the blessed Trinity there is no manifestation of it. Rather, wrath is a temporary manifestation of God’s holiness in response to sin.]

Ligonier National Conference – Steve Lawson (II) -The Holy One of God: The Holiness of Jesus

Look again at the title,”The Holy One of God.” This is a formal, technical title. “The Holy One of God” is a formal title for God in the book of Isaiah. No less than 26 times in the book of Isaiah we find this title for Jehovah God: “The Holy One of God.” It is picked up in Ezekiel, Psalms, and elsewhere. So when this demon says, “I know who you are, the Holy One of God,” the identity is unquestionable. The identity was assigned to God in the Old Testament, and it is assigned to Jesus in the New Testament. That is what is taking place — from the lips of a demon-possessed man.

Ligonier National Conference – D.A. Carson – A Holy Nation: The Church’s High Calling

When Paul in Romans 15 discusses his evangelism, it is called a “priestly service”. We become priests not because we have some peculiar role (e.g., full-time ministry), but because as Christians we are to pray for those outside and to present the living God’s gospel to them. Talking to an unbeliever is a priestly act of mediation. We are all priests in this sense; believers are built into a spiritual priesthood. We all have access to God. There are not two standards of holiness on this side of the cross. We are all a part of the priesthood (what a privilege!) of the King of the universe.

Ligonier National Conference – Derek Thomas – Be Ye Holy: The Necessity of Sanctification

It is one thing to talk about the holiness of God and another thing to long for holiness in our own life. Consider the “third use” of the law (as a guide). Or Luther’s refrain: We are saved by faith alone, but not by a faith that is alone. Or James: Faith without works is dead.

But ours is a man-centered age. We like books on how to be a good father or how to improve your diet, rather than how to be holy and Christ-like. And in our circles, we can get caught up with theological issues and miss the point that the goal of all theology is to drive us into a holiness of life. R. Murray Mc’Chenye’s great statement has been noted: “My people’s greatest need is my personal holiness.” This is serious business because without holiness, the author of Hebrews tells us, no one will see the Lord.

Ligonier National Conference – Q&A Session III – Dr. Donald Carson, Dr. Derek Thomas, Dr. Robert Godfrey, Rev. Thabiti Anyabwile

3. What are the challenges associated with holiness (or the lack of it) in the church today?

We need to expect suffering. Growth in holiness is a matter of the heart but also external forces in the church. There has been a decline in honoring a day for the Lord, and thus a decline in time for the Lord, and thus a lack of personal holiness. Godfrey exhorted churches to have Sunday morning and evening services. Anyabwile noted that our union with Christ gives us motivation for holiness.

Carson: We haven’t concentrated on God and the gospel, that’s why we don’t have enough holiness. Everything is tied to that. Don’t think about it only in terms of “not doing stuff” or “doing stuff,” and that reduces to moralism. The law cannot save, although there is a place for law.

Ligonier National Conference – R.C. Sproul (II) – A Consuming Fire: Holiness, Wrath and Justice

The imagery employed in Jonathan Edwards’ famous sermon Sinners In The Hands of An Angry God. In that sermon, he employed numerous metaphors, all of which had Scriptural origin. One of them is that of a dam breaking. People are storing up wrath against the day of wrath. And another is of a spider’s web, holding sinners up by a single thread. And that single thread is held by the hand of God. We rightly remember the sermon’s topic as the wrath of God. But even moreso it is a sermon about the grace of God–holding people up from the pit, and preventing their immediate destruction.

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Challies – The Holiness of God Conference

Tim Challies has been live blogging The Holiness of God Conference. Here are the posts available so far.

Ligonier Conference – Al Mohler – John Calvin: Preacher and Teacher

Calvin understood the majesty of preaching because he understood the majesty of God. Calvin’s mode of preaching was verse-by-verse, book-by-book so he would not selectively avoid things he did not wish to teach. In this way God’s people receive all that they need and not just what the preacher determines the people need. The preacher is neither to add nor subtract from Scripture.

Ligonier Conference – Sinclair Ferguson – The Doctrines of Grace

Calvin says there is no such thing as grace, only Jesus Christ. There is not something outside of Jesus Christ that the Holy Spirit dispenses to you like a lump sum. There is only Jesus Christ which is why one of the most significant and startling things Calvin says is that all that Christ has done for us is of no value to us unless we get, by faith, Jesus Christ himself. And in just a moment you can see how the whole medieval system with priests and sacraments and sacrifices and saints and Mary was immediately exploded and destroyed. What the Spirit is doing and bringing you into is the same as the Lord Jesus himself. There is nothing between—no pope, no bishops, no sacraments, no priests—only the Holy Spirit bringing you to Jesus who is all your righteousness and all the righteousness you will ever need.

From Calvin we learn this: it is all there for you in Christ, so drink from no other fountain than Christ. We are all, even in our evangelical hearts, liable to sink back into errors that make us think there is something in us that qualifies us, something that Jesus Christ could give me without giving himself and me giving myself to him. This is Calvin: it is all of God, it is all in Christ, it all comes through the Holy Spirit.

Ligonier Conference – Q&A – Dr. Sinclair Ferguson, Dr. Ligon Duncan, Dr. Steven Lawson, Dr. Al Mohler

Where should people start to learn about Calvin?

Ferguson – If you are daunted by the Institutes, begin with The Golden Booklet of the True Christian Life. You will probably find that Calvin is not as daunting as it may seem. If he didn’t know that Packer was going to do it, he probably would have called this book Knowing God.

Lawson – Read his sermons. The preaching of the word is the primary ordinary means of grace. Begin with his sermons on Galatians and Ephesians.

Mohler – Dive into the deep end of the pool by reading the introduction to the Institutes. Even if you need to read them two or three times, read them! It is one of the greatest works of Christian devotional literature ever written.

Ligonier Conference – R.C. Sproul – I Am the Lord, There is No Other

We also need to consider from this text what this God does. He brings the light and the darkness, he brings well-being and calamity. After 9/11 it was unthinkable to the American people that God could have anything to do with calamity. We are people who believe that God can bless a nation but refuse to believe that he can also judge a nation. We believe this because we do not know who God is. The God of popular religion is not holy. This is not the God of Isaiah 45—the God who brings calamity, the God who brings the bear market and the bull market, who pulls kingdoms up and tears kingdoms down. “I will raise you up Cyrus, but I can also tear you right down.”

Ligonier Conference – Alistair Begg – The Breath of the Almighty: The Holy Spirit

The nature of this topic, he said, makes it virtually horizonless. Considerations of any doctrine, but particularly this one, that are not grounded within the controls of the Bible itself, may lead to all kinds of flights of fancy. There has been as much confusion within evangelicalism about the person and work of the Spirit as there has been in any other part of the Bible.

Ligonier Conference – Thabiti Anyabwile – Cosmic Treason: Sin and the Holiness of God

Sin is personal in nature. It is against God himself, provoking his wrath. Sin is apostasy, turning away from God. Our culture teaches that sin is not often against anyone but is just a mistake or a blooper. But this passage makes it clear that our sin does land on something. It lands squarely in the sight of a holy God who will not look upon sin. Our sin is an offense against God, a personal rebellion against him. It not only incites his anger but is also treasonous, rebelling against the rule and love of God. Israel is often called God’s wife. Can you think of a more treasonous act than to declare union with a husband but then to commit adultery with another?

Ligonier Conference – Robert Godfrey – Wounded for Our Transgressions: The Holiness of God and the Cross

Are you beginning to see what it cost Jesus Christ to be the Savior? When we say he is king it sounds good, when we say he is priest it sounds honorable. And he is those things. But the depth of our salvation is to be found in the willingness of Jesus to become a leper for lepers, to become sin for sinners. “Surely he has borne our sickness.” Jesus was not literally a leper, of course, but just as Uzziah the good king was afflicted with leprosy to show the people the sinfulness of sin, so in some sense we have to think of Jesus as a leper to realize the depths of what it meant for him to take our sins upon himself. We can make this sound like an easy transaction. How hard can sin-bearing be for the eternal son of God? We may slip into such an attitude as the cross becomes too familiar. We may begin to lose a sense of the horror of the cross.


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Holiness of God Conference Starts Today

Today starts the Holiness of God Conference Live Webcast of the 2009 National Conference

Note times are Orlando, FL time (Eastern Time)

Also has a Spanish Broadcast

MINI-CONFERENCE:
John Calvin (1509–2009) — Celebrating a Legacy
In 2009, we celebrate the 500th birthday of John Calvin. It is only appropriate at this time to reflect on his legacy. In the mini-conference, four participants will discuss Calvin’s impact in several aspects of the church’s life and thought. There will be four lectures followed by a Question & Answer time:

1. R. Albert Mohler – John Calvin: Preacher and Teacher
(Thursday, March 19, 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.)
John Calvin was one of the most important figures in the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Today, five hundred years after his birth, his influence continues to be felt. In this message, Dr. Mohler will reflect on the life and work of Calvin, focusing in particular on his role as a preacher and teacher of the Word.

2. Ligon Duncan – Calvin and the Christian Life
(Thursday, March 19, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.)
John Calvin is sometimes perceived as a dry and dusty academic whose writings deal only with abstract theological topics. To read Calvin, however, is to read one who was devoted to seeing God’s Word impact the lives of Christian people everywhere. In this message, Ligon Duncan will explore some of Calvin’s most practical wisdom for those who seek to follow Christ.

3. Sinclair Ferguson – The Doctrines of Grace
(Thursday, March 19, 1:15 – 2:00 p.m.)
Much of the significance of the Protestant Reformers such as John Calvin is found in their rediscovery of the biblical doctrines of grace. After having been buried for centuries under unbiblical doctrines and traditions, their rediscovery and proclamation turned Europe upside down. In this message, Dr. Ferguson will look at Calvin’s formulation of these crucial doctrines and explain why they are no less significant today.

4. Steven J. Lawson – The Legacy of John Calvin
(Thursday, March 19, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.)
The modern history of the church and of the world would be entirely different without John Calvin. The influence of his thought has been felt not only in the teaching and worship of the church, but also within politics, economics, and the wider culture. In this message, Dr. Lawson will look at the legacy of Calvin, explaining what we can learn from him today.

Questions and Answers
(Thursday, March 19, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m.)
Dr. Sinclair Ferguson, Dr. Ligon Duncan, Dr. Steven Lawson, Dr. Al Mohler

——————————————————————————

MAIN SESSIONS:
The Holiness of God
The angels declare that God is “Holy, Holy, Holy.” Without a proper grasp of God’s holiness we do not understand who He truly is, nor do we understand who we truly are. Once we begin to grasp the true meaning of God’s holiness, our lives and our worship will be forever changed. In this conference, prominent Reformed Christian teachers will expound and reflect upon what the Bible says about God’s holiness and ours. The main sessions will consist of eleven lectures:

1. R.C. Sproul – I Am the Lord, There is No Other
(Thursday, March 19, 6:40 – 7:30 p.m.)
Before he discovered the Gospel, contemplation of God’s holiness and his own sinfulness drove Martin Luther to despair. What did he grasp about holiness that most of us do not? In this lecture, Dr. Sproul will introduce the topic of the conference by explaining the meaning of the biblical concept of holiness.

2. R.C. Sproul, Jr. – Train Up Your Children: Family Worship of the Holy God
(Thursday, March 19, 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.)
The worship of our sovereign God is not to be relegated to a mere hour or two each Sunday. Instead, our worship of Him should pervade every aspect of our lives. In this lecture, Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. will exhort believers to worship God as a family, providing encouragement and practical instruction.

3. Sinclair Ferguson – Hallowed Be Your Name: The Holiness of the Father
(Friday, March 20, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.)
In the Lord’s Prayer, Jesus instructed His disciples to acknowledge the Father’s holiness and to adore Him in their every prayer. He is the one whom the seraphim adore, singing, “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts!” In this lecture, Dr. Ferguson will explore what the Bible teaches us concerning the holiness of our Father in heaven.

4. Steven J. Lawson – The Holy One of God: The Holiness of Jesus
(Friday, March 20, 9:40 – 10:40 a.m.)
The disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ referred to Him as “the Holy One of God.” In doing so, they said something not only about His character, but also about His relationship to the Father. In this lecture, Dr. Lawson will look at what the Bible teaches us about the purity and sinlessness of Christ.

5. Alistair Begg – The Breath of the Almighty: The Holy Spirit
(Friday, March 20, 11:30 a.m. – 12:35 p.m.)
The third person of the Trinity is the Holy Spirit, the one whom Job refers to as “the breath of the Almighty.” His work includes conforming believers to the holy image of Christ. In this lecture, Dr. Begg will look at the person and work of the one person of the Trinity whose very name includes the adjective “holy.”

Questions & Answers
(Friday, March 20, 2:30 – 3:25 p.m.)
Dr. Sinclair Ferguson, Dr. Steven Lawson, Dr. Alistair Begg, Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. Moderated by R.C. Sproul

6. Thabiti Anyabwile – Cosmic Treason: Sin and the Holiness of God
(Friday, March 20, 4:05 – 5:05 p.m.)
The sinfulness of sin is not grasped in our day because the holiness of God is not grasped. Sin will only be understood for what it is when God is understood for who He is. In this lecture, Rev. Anyabwile will explain the true sinfulness of sin in the light of the holy and pure character of God.

7. D. A. Carson – A Holy Nation: The Church’s High Calling
(Friday, March 20, 7:15 – 8:00 p.m.)
The history of redemption reveals God calling a people out of the world to be a holy people. In this lecture, Dr. Carson will examine why God has called His people in both the old and new covenants to be a kingdom of priests and a holy nation, and he will explain what this means for us as believers today.

8. Robert Godfrey – Wounded for Our Transgressions: The Holiness of God and the Cross
(Saturday, March 21, 8:30 – 9:40 a.m.)
All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. This is the universal problem faced by all men, a problem requiring a solution man cannot provide. In this lecture, Dr. Godfrey will examine why the holiness of God required an atonement for sin and how Jesus fulfilled that requirement for us.

9. Derek Thomas – Be Ye Holy: The Necessity of Sanctification
(Saturday, March 21, 9:40 – 10:30 a.m.)
According to Scripture, we are justified by faith alone in Jesus Christ alone. Yet our Lord calls those who have been so justified to a life of holiness. In this lecture, Dr. Thomas will explain the importance and necessity of individual sanctification as well as the means God has provided for it.

Questions & Answers
(Saturday, March 21, 11:25 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.)
Dr. Donald Carson, Dr. Derek Thomas, Dr. Robert Godfrey, Rev. Thabiti Anyabwile Moderated by Dr. R.C. Sproul

10. R.C. Sproul – A Consuming Fire: Holiness, Wrath, and Justice
(Saturday, March 21, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.)
There have always been those who have argued that a truly holy God could not or would not consign anyone to eternal punishment. Such, they say, is inconsistent with God’s love. In this lecture, Dr. Sproul will explain why the holiness of God is not inconsistent with eternal punishment of sin, but in fact requires it.

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2009 National Conference – The Holiness Of God

the-holiness-of-god-conference

National Conference, March 19-21 (2009)

Conference Theme: The Holiness of God. This is an expanded conference with more speakers than ever (Anyabwile, Begg, Carson, Duncan, Ferguson, Godfrey, Lawson, Mohler, Sproul Jr., Sproul, Thomas). Holiness is the characteristic of God’s nature that is at the very core of His being. Without a proper grasp of God’s holiness we do not understand who He truly is, nor do we understand who we truly are. In our pre-conference seminar, we celebrate the 500th birthday of John Calvin.

Live Webcast of the 2009 National Conference

The biggest event of the year for Ligonier Ministries is just around the corner. We are excited to once again be able to offer a free, live webcast of the conference, available in both English and Spanish. See below for details.

While there is nothing quite like being able to attend the conference in person, the live webcast is a helpful way to serve those unable to travel or those living overseas. In the past, we’ve had up to 22,000 people around the world sharing the experience through the webcast. This ministry outreach helps fulfill our desire to “awaken as many people as possible to the holiness of God by proclaiming, teaching, and defending His holiness in all its fullness.” Spread the word and enjoy.

Click here to sign-up

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Sound Doctrine, Sound Words – Phil Johnson

Sound Doctrine, Sound Words (Part 1)

This morning I want to look at two verses in Titus 2—verses 7-8. This is an admonition from Paul to Titus, his friend, partner, protege, and true son in the faith. Titus is one of the unsung heroes of the early church—a young pastor whose faithful support and constant behind-the-scenes labor made him extremely precious to Paul. Paul writes to Titus with these instructions (Titus 2:7-8): “Show yourself in all respects to be a model of good works, and in your teaching show integrity, dignity, and sound speech that cannot be condemned, so that an opponent may be put to shame, having nothing evil to say about us.”

I chose that text, frankly, because I’m deeply concerned about the tendency of so many pastors lately to employ profanity, crude and obscene words, vile subject matter, carnal topics, graphic sexual imagery, erotic language, and filthy jokes. Most of you, I know, are aware of the trend I’m talking about. I’m tempted to call it the pornification of the pulpit. The justification usually given is that coarse language and sexual themes are the tools of contextualization. It’s a way to make us sound more relevant. Lots of voices in the church are insistent that this is absolutely essential if we want to reach certain segments of our culture. ….

Sound Doctrine, Sound Words (Part 2)

One more thing about contextualization. (I spoke on this subject at last year’s Shepherds’ Conference): If your approach to contextualization is designed mainly to make you fit comfortably into a pagan culture—then you have an upside-down view of what Paul meant when he spoke of becoming all things to all men so that he might by all means win some. …

Sound Doctrine, Sound Words (Part 3)

There are two kinds of profanity every Christian needs to avoid. One is what the Bible calls foolish and filthy talk—coarse, obscene, smutty words that usually make reference to private bodily functions. The other is every kind of irreverence, ranging from that which trivializes sacred things to the full-on blasphemy of using the Lord’s name in vain.

Scripture is not silent on such things. These are not gray areas. Blasphemy is a grievous sin, and that includes all kinds of flippancy when we use the Lord’s name or talk about that which is sacred. Do a study of the third commandment and pay careful attention to all the things Scripture treats as a misuse of the Lord’s name. Once you understand what the Bible says about flippant irreverence, if you’re not compelled to eliminate every kind of joking about sacred things, you must have a heart of stone. …

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