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Jewels from Romans #4

Romans 2:3-5

3 Do you suppose, O man—you who judge those who do such things and yet do them yourself—that you will escape the judgment of God?
4 Or do you presume on the riches of his kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead you to repentance?
5 But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed
. (ESV)

The unconverted person who otherwise attempts to lead a moral life is guilty of making two bad assumptions concerning the wrath and judgment of God. The first bad assumption is that the judgment of God will not come because their sins are not as bad as the wicked people whom Paul described in Romans chapter 1. The unconverted person who attempts to lead a moral life looks with disdain upon the homosexual, the idol worshipper, the murderer, and they know that God will judge these people for their sins. However, the unconverted but moral person does not know the truth of Romans 2:1 “Therefore you have no excuse, O man, every one of you who judges. For in passing judgment on another you condemn yourself, because you, the judge, practice the very same things.” (ESV) The list of sins which Paul gives us in Romans 1:29-31 is extensive enough to cover all of mankind. There is no one who has not committed at least one of these sins. The unconverted person who is attempting to lead a moral life is deluded in the belief that God will not judge their own sins in like manner to God’s judgment of the sins of the openly wicked person.

The second bad assumption the unconverted person who otherwise attempts to lead a moral life makes is that God’s patience is evidence that God will not judge them for their sins. Romans 2:4 says “Or do you presume on the riches of his kindness and forbearance and patience, not knowing that God’s kindness is meant to lead you to repentance?” (ESV) The forbearance and patience of God in judging sin is for the purpose of allowing time for mankind to repent of their sins. However, many people interpret this forbearance as an evidence that God really doesn’t care about their sins.

Romans 3:5 says “But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.” (ESV) There is an excellent word picture that we can use to illustrate this verse. God’s patience is like a dam which is holding back His judgment. I used to work in the Engineering Department of a fairly large City. We would sometimes construct a dam. Water would slowly build up against that dam. For the first few months, there would be almost no standing water behind the dam. Then, as time passes, water would build up behind the dam until the lake reached full pool. One year we had a significant rain event which caused one of our lakes to overtop the dam, and as the water began to run down the dry side of the dam, the dam was eroded away and eventually failed, releasing all the water stored up to rush downstream. This is a picture of the patience of God storing up wrath against sinners for the day of judgment. More and more sins store up more and more wrath behind the dam of patience, until the day when God’s patience gives way to the flood of His judgment.

By Berean Husband

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“…man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart…”

This is a verse that is commonly used to excuse all manner of outward appearance.

1 Sam 16:7 …for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart. KJV

This is one of those verses that even non-Christians seem to know and throw out along with “judge not”. However, if you will look at the full passage for the phrase you will see it means much different than it is commonly claimed to mean.

1 Sam 16:7 But the Lord said unto Samuel, Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him: for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart. KJV

The Lord tells Samuel to “Look not on his countenance” or “on the height of his stature.” How exactly does this have anything to do with clothing? The Lord is telling Samuel to not judge David by his “countenance” meaning whether he is handsome or plain. This is not referring to clothing at all. Look at the next criteria “on the height of his stature.” This is how tall he is, not what David is wearing. David very well could have been very short.

Later in the passage, this verse is found:

1 Sam 16:12 And he sent, and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and withal of a beautiful countenance, and goodly to look to. KJV

What does this have to do with his clothing? Not one thing, it is describing David’s physical appearance.

The Lord will judge us on our heart but we as mere men must judge only on the appearance and the fruit, not a man’s heart. A person’s outward appearance is an indicator of the condition of the heart.

A person can look perfectly modest, pure, righteous, and God fearing on the outside and have an evil, depraved, and God-hating heart. Nevertheless, a person who is modest, pure, righteous, and God fearing in the heart cannot look immodest, evil, depraved, and God hating on the outside.

Luke 6:45 A good man out of the good treasure of his heart bringeth forth that which is good; and an evil man out of the evil treasure of his heart bringeth forth that which is evil: for of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaketh. KJV

Just as out of the heart the mouth speaks, also out of the heart the clothing choices are made. Are your clothes chosen to glorify the Lord and represent Him or are your clothes chosen to glorify yourself?

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To Judge or Not to Judge, That is the Question…

Mark (Kelli‘s Husband) at Ponderings, Musings, and Other Random Thoughts… posted a comment on Rick Pino – “Christian Worship Leader”??.

His post grew into a post (like mine have before).

To Judge or Not to Judge, That is the Question…


Matthew 7:1-5- Do not judge so that you will not be judged. For in the way you judge, you will be judged; and by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, Let me take the speck out of your eye, and behold, the log is in your own eye? Your hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.

Now, do these verses teach that we are not supposed to judge in any way? Can we not say anything that is perceived as negative to anybody? In other words, can we ever tell anybody that they are wrong? Let’s get to the bottom of this judging thing. Let’s begin by looking at what these verses do not mean. Then we will see what they do mean.

He then covers many verses that deal with sin and judgment. Between subjects like modesty and the “Bama Twins” and Rick Pino, I have found most who claim to be Christians are not willing to have anyone question anything they do. They twist “judge not” in to one of the most mistreated, misused and most quoted verses in the Bible. Right along with “God is Love” and “the Lord looketh on the heart“. They are all used to excuse any manner of sin because of the reasoning given that “A Loving God looks at the heart and would not judge them, nor should anyone else.”

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Principles of Holiness – Principle 4

Holiness Principle #4 – The truth about the holiness of my life will be revealed at the judgment seat of Christ.

Romans 14:9-13

9 For this very reason, Christ died and returned to life so that he might be the Lord of both the dead and the living.
10 You, then, why do you judge your brother? Or why do you look down on your brother? For we will all stand before God’s judgment seat.
11 It is written: “‘As surely as I live,’ says the Lord, ‘every knee will bow before me; every tongue will confess to God.'”
12 So then, each of us will give an account of himself to God.
13 Therefore let us stop passing judgment on one another. Instead, make up your mind not to put any stumbling block or obstacle in your brother’s way.
(NIV)

Here’s a mental picture to begin with today. Suppose you have committed a very serious crime and have been arrested. You are in jail and your trial date has been set. In your jail cell there is another person who has been accused of a crime just as serious as yours. And it turns out that his trial date is the same as yours. As the both of you languish in jail, your trial dates get closer and closer. It’s a month before your trial. Then it’s the week before your trial. Now it’s the day before your trial. And you look over to your cellmate, and say, “I’m worried about you. I don’t think you’ve got a very good defense. You need to spend some time thinking about what you’ve done wrong and get ready to face the judge tomorrow.” It’s 24 hours before YOU are going to trial for YOUR crime and you’re worried about someone else’s defense? You should be worried about your OWN defense.

But do we Christians not do the exact same thing? Every day every one of us gets closer and closer to facing Jesus on his judgment seat to give an account for our lives. But we spend our time pointing out the faults and failures of other people instead of examining our own lives. That is the point Paul is making in verse 10. “You, then, why do you judge your brother? Or why do you look down on your brother? For we will all stand before God’s judgment seat.” (NIV) We should be a lot less concerned about judging others and pay more attention to judging ourselves. Paul tells us in 1 Corinthians 11:31 “But if we judged ourselves, we would not come under judgment.” (NIV)

Let’s go back to the example of the courtroom. If you have ever been in court before, you know the feeling of respect and awe that the judge holds. You are very careful with every word you say. You are never disrespectful to the judge. Why? Because the judge has a position of authority over you. The judge could make your life very miserable, or he could be lenient. Is this any less true with Jesus Christ? Every time we make a decision in our life, we should realize that we will have to give an account for that decision before Jesus Christ. Will I be able to defend the actions that I will take today and the decisions I make?

Maybe someone reading this has figured out a plan. They say, “I’m not going to the judgment seat of Christ.” Well, my friend, I don’t think you’ll have the option. Hebrews 9:27 tells us “And as it is appointed for men to die once, but after this the judgment” (NKJV) And again, we read in 2 Corinthians 5:10 “For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive what is due him for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad.” (NIV) Now, I want to make it clear that I believe that this judgment is not for the purpose of condemnation, but rather is for the purpose of commendation. We are told in Romans 8:1 “Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus” (NIV)

So if we all must face the judgment seat of Christ, what will we be judged for? There are three things that Jesus will judge each and every Christian based on: our thoughts, our words, and our deeds. This is not a complete list, but is representative of the level of holiness that God expects from every Christian. Let’s look at these three in reverse order.

First, every Christian will be judged based on their deeds. That is, we will be judged based on the works which we do. Read 1 Corinthians 3:11-15:

11 For no one can lay any foundation other than the one already laid, which is Jesus Christ.
12 If any man builds on this foundation using gold, silver, costly stones, wood, hay or straw,
13 his work will be shown for what it is, because the Day will bring it to light. It will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test the quality of each man’s work.
14 If what he has built survives, he will receive his reward.
15 If it is burned up, he will suffer loss; he himself will be saved, but only as one escaping through the flames.
(NIV)

Notice that the foundation is all-important. We can do good works for an entire lifetime and it is nothing but filth before God unless it is built on the foundation of faith in the Lord Jesus Christ (see Philippians 3:4-9). But also notice that the quality of the works built on the foundation of Jesus Christ is important. Some works are compared to precious metals and fine jewels. Other works are compared to sticks and hay. Paul then uses the imagery of light and fire that will test the quality of the works. In the Parable of the Sower, Jesus likens the heat of the sun to times of testing and trials in our lives. If what we have built on the foundation of Jesus Christ survives the fire that tests the quality of our works, then we will receive our reward. But if our works are destroyed, then we lose our reward, but we will still be saved.

Second, every Christian will be judged based on their words. Read Matthew 12:34-37:

34 You brood of vipers, how can you who are evil say anything good? For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks.
35 The good man brings good things out of the good stored up in him, and the evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in him.
36 But I tell you that men will have to give account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken.
37 For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned.”
(NIV)

Why are the words we speak so important? After all, they have no substance. They are spoken, and then they are gone. Very little of what we say gets recorded here on earth. Most of our words have little lasting effect. In verse 36, we are even told that we are judged based on our “careless” words. The Greek word is “argos”. It doesn’t mean “careless” as in “hurtful”, it means “careless” as in “inactive”. The KJV uses the word “idle”. The Bible recognizes that most of what we will say is nothing but careless, idle conversation. So why are these words so important that we will be judged based on EVERY ONE of them? The answer to this question is found at the end of verse 34. “For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks.” (NIV) The best indication of the state of a person’s heart is what comes out of their mouth when they speak. And yes, that means when you are giving a speech, or delivering a sermon, or teaching a class, or testifying about your faith. But it also means what you said about last Saturday’s football game Monday morning at work. And what you said Tuesday morning when your car wouldn’t start. And what you told your wife when you were an hour late coming in from work on Wednesday. And what you told your mom when you came in from your date on Friday night. I imagine we should all do a better job monitoring what comes out of our mouths.

Third, every Christian will be judged based on their thoughts. We are told in Romans 2:16 “On that day when, as my Gospel proclaims, God by Jesus Christ will judge men in regard to the things which they conceal (their hidden thoughts).” (AMP). And again, in Hebrews 4:12-13 we are told “For the word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart. Nothing in all creation is hidden from God’s sight. Everything is uncovered and laid bare before the eyes of him to whom we must give account.” (NIV) Someone may object, “I can’t control my thoughts! How can I be judged for something I have no control over?” I respond that your premise is not true because it is not Biblical. You can, and in fact, are advised to control your thoughts. Paul writes in 2 Corinthians 10:5 “We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ.” (NIV) The person who claims to have no control over their thoughts has probably not tried to have any control over their thoughts. Again we ask the question: Why are my thoughts so important? They hurt no one. Wrong. They hurt you. And they hurt others also. Did not Jesus in the Sermon on the Mount tell us that lust is just as bad as adultery and hatred is just as bad as murder? (see Matthew 5:21-28).

As we move toward a conclusion of this principle, let’s turn our attention back to Romans 14:12. “So then, each of us will give an account of himself to God.” (NIV) We will not be called upon to give an account for someone else. We will be called upon to give an account for ourselves. And it will be on an individual basis. Each one of us will have our own opportunity to stand for judgment. Actually, I think verse 11 says that we will kneel. “It is written: “‘As surely as I live,’ says the Lord, ‘every knee will bow before me; every tongue will confess to God.‘” (NIV) We will be required to give an account for every thought, word, and deed that has made up our lives. And we will give this account directly to God. What is my goal? It is to be found faithful. To hear the words: “Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!” (Matthew 25:21 NIV)

By Berean Husband

See also:

Principles of Holiness – Principle 1

Principles of Holiness – Principle 2

Principles of Holiness – Principle 3

Principles of Holiness – Principle 4

Principles of Holiness – Principle 5

Principles of Holiness – Principle 6

Principles of Holiness – Principle 7

Principles of Holiness – Principle 8

Principles of Holiness – Principle 9

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Christians Judging Others?

“Judge Not”

How many times does a Christian hear this if they say anything negative about anything or anyone? I think this is the most popular verse. Most people know this verse even if they have never read a Bible? In the following article these quotes about judging caught my attention.

The Dangers of Todd Bentley Theology

BY Hank Hanegraaff

This raises the question: Should Christians judge the teachings of their leaders?

Not only is judging permissible – it is a responsibility. Nobody’s teachings are above sound judgment. Especially those who have influence and power. Biblically, authority and accountability go hand in hand. The greater the responsibility, the greater the accountability. The precedent for making right judgments comes from the Bible. In the Old Testament the Israelites were commanded to practice sound judgment. They were told to thoroughly test the teachings of their leaders. In the New Testament the Apostle Paul commands the Thessalonians to test all things and to hold fast to that which is good. Paul lauds the Bereans for doing just that, for testing his teachings.

While our Lord cautioned followers not to judge self-righteously, He also counseled them to make judgments based on right standards, and in the contest of oft-quoted commands by Jesus such as “Judge not or you too will be judged,” Jesus also exhorted us to judge false prophets whose teachings and whose behavior lead people to abject misery. Thus, while we’re commanded not to judge hypocritically, we are, nevertheless, called to judge.

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