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Presumptuous Sins

I was asked about where in the Bible it speaks of deliberate or presumptuous sin so I decided to share it here also.

Old Testament examples:

Numbers 5:29

29 You shall have one law for him who does anything unintentionally, for him who is native among the people of Israel and for the stranger who sojourns among them.
30 But the person who does anything with a high hand, whether he is native or a sojourner, reviles the LORD, and that person shall be cut off from among his people.
31 Because he has despised the word of the LORD and has broken his commandment, that person shall be utterly cut off; his iniquity shall be on him.”

Psalms 19:13 Keep back your servant also from presumptuous sins;
let them not have dominion over me!
Then I shall be blameless,
and innocent of great transgression.

New Testament verses:

Hebrews 10: 26-31

26 For if we go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins,
27 but a fearful expectation of judgment, and a fury of fire that will consume the adversaries.
28 Anyone who has set aside the law of Moses dies without mercy on the evidence of two or three witnesses.
29 How much worse punishment, do you think, will be deserved by the one who has spurned the Son of God, and has profaned the blood of the covenant by which he was sanctified, and has outraged the Spirit of grace?
30 For we know him who said, “Vengeance is mine; I will repay.” And again, “The Lord will judge his people.”
31 It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.

James 4:17 So whoever knows the right thing to do and fails to do it, for him it is sin.

2 Peter 2:21 For it would have been better for them never to have known the way of righteousness than after knowing it to turn back from the holy commandment delivered to them.


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Complaining

Heard recently:

Complaining – That’s just life.

Actually it should be:

Complaining – That’s just sin.

Philippians 2:14 Do all things without murmurings and disputings: 15 That ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God, without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world;


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No Condemnation – Spurgeon

We are today accepted in the Beloved, absolved from sin, acquitted at the bar of God.  …

We are now-even now pardoned; even now are our sins put away; even now we stand in the sight of God accepted, as though we had never been guilty. “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus.” There is not a sin in the Book of God, even now, against one of His people. Who dareth to lay anything to their charge? There is neither speck, nor spot, nor wrinkle, nor any such thing remaining upon any one believer in the matter of justification in the sight of the Judge of all the earth.

Charles H. Spurgeon


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Tears

“All the tears of a penitent sinner, should he shed as many as there have been fallen drops of rain since the creation, cannot wash away one sin.  The everlasting burnings in hell cannot purify  the flaming conscience from the least sin.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

John Flavel


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That’s Just The Way I Am

I’m sure you have all heard someone say “She is just shy” or “He just doesn’t do well around strangers“. The real question is are we ignoring sinful tendencies when we use worldly terms with no Biblical basis. Challies reflects on this idea in his podcast Introverted.

So what is it? Is introversion like gender or race, things that are given to me and over which I have no say, just who I am? Or are they things that I can control or things that I can choose? Will we all be introverts or all be extroverts in heaven? Are these real distinctions or could it be that the are ways we excuse our sin? What I don’t want to do is excuse sin or weakness by using respected or respectable terms that have no biblical basis. There are some ways that psychology offers some truth, but there are also ways in which it will inevitably lead us astray.

My challenge, and it is a challenge I face all the time, is to keep introversion from enabling or excusing sin. Introversion can quickly and easily become a way to validate sin. I can excuse selfishness, self-centeredness, escapism, lack of hospitality, rudeness. I can stay away from people and excuse it as being just the way I am, as being who I am. I can be shy and quiet when the Lord calls me to be strong and bold. Of course extroversion can also be a way to validate sin. The extrovert can run away from solitude, avoid spending time alone, validate himself by the amount of time he spends with others, doubt himself when he is alone. This introvert/extrovert distinction affects each of us in all kinds of ways.

Tim Challies in Introverted

Going through Jay Adams’ Nouthetic Counseling or Ed Welch and CCEF will make you reconsider many of your preconceived ideas about yourself and others. It just might surprise you how influenced by secular psychology and the world’s ideas you really are. There is alot of trash the church has allowed to influence her from the world.


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Jesus Became Sin – Paul Washer

Deep South Founders Conference

Session 7 – Saturday Morning Service – January 14, 2012

Paul Washer

Jesus Became Sin

2 Corinthians 5:21

The fact that God became flesh is horrendous. But it did not end there. God became sin. He who knew no sin became sin on our behalf. It is not that Jesus was corrupted or defiled or impure. Jesus’s righteousness was imputed to us because our sins were imputed to Him. There is a legal declaration of righteousness and a practical declaration of righteousness – God treats us as He treats His Son Jesus Christ – being right with Him. God both legally declared Jesus guilty and God treated Him as guilty.

Jesus knew no sin. We have never loved God as God ought to be loved. There was never a moment that Jesus did not love God as He should be loved. We can say the same with obedience. We are cursed because we have not done all the things written in the law (Galatians 3:10). Jesus completely obeyed and fulfilled the law.  But then Jesus bore the curse for us (Galatians 3:13). Turn the beatitudes upside-down and you have defined the curse that belongs to us but were thrown upon Christ.

The blessings and curses from Mount Gerazim and Mount Ebal are a picture of what happened on the cross of Calvary. Jesus Christ was the covenant keeper. We are the covenant breakers. But the curses were taken by Jesus and the blessings fall upon us. God crushed His only-begotten Son on the cross of Calvary. This is the bridge between Mount Gerazim and Mount Ebal.

How can God bless the wicked? How can God be just and the justifier? How can God deal mercifully with Adam, Noah, Abraham, David? Because of Jesus Christ on Calvary. Because Jesus Christ was cursed for them, for me, on Calvary. Jesus Christ took full responsibility for them and for me. This gives a whole new meaning to the command to take up our cross and follow Jesus. It is what happened to Jesus in prayer in the garden of Gethsemane. Jesus did not sweat drops of blood and pray that the cup be taken away from Him because of the physical act of crucifixion. It was because He had to bear the curse of all His people and the wrath of Almighty God.

Jehovah Jireh – God will provide. Not a new house, not a new car. God will provide a Savior. God showed His love for me when He did not withhold His Son, His only Son, from me.

Audio:

The Doctrine of Man – Part 3 by Paul Washer

 


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The Sins of Others

“The sins of others leave some kind of stain upon the conscience. I question whether you can read a newspaper and scan the story of a murder or a robbery, or survey with more distant glance in any book of history the sin of your fellow men, without being in a degree injured therewith.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Charles Spurgeon


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Forgiveness of Sinners – Jay Adams

To say God forgives sin is true. But in saying it that way, we must never lose sight of the fact that it is sinners from whom the liability of guilt is lifted. God punishes persons and He forgives persons. Some try to distinguish between sin and the sinner: “God hates sin; loves the sinner.” Such separation isn’t possible. God sends sinners to hell; they, not their sin, are punished eternally. Christ, not the sin He bore, suffered and died on the cross.

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Jay Adams, from The Basis for Forgiveness

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Can the Sin Be Separated From The Sinner?

Is it possible to separate the sin from the sinner?  See it sounds nice to say “God loves the sinner, but hates the sin.” But is it possible? Yes and no. Don’t you hate answers like that? However, if you are a believer you shouldn’t.

Sin cannot be separated from a sinner.  Sin only exists in theory until there is an entity to commit sin.  God created the world and all that was in it.  He declared it was good, even then though the idea or concept of sin existed.  Remember that Christ was slain before the foundation of the world and the names were written in the Book of Life (Rev 13:8).  So the concept of sin and evil existed from the foundation of the world, otherwise there would have been no need for the slain Christ.  When Satan and his angels of darkness rebelled then sin was encompassed in a being.  When Adam and Eve sinned in the Garden, they became sinners.

What was cursed as a result of sin?  Sin itself was not cursed and punished, but the sinners.  Satan and his Angels were cast out of Heaven.  Adam and Eve were cursed and cast from the Garden.  Sin cannot be punished only, sinners can be punished.  Sin is not what is sent to Hell at the last day, sinners are.

Everyone would say they hate the sin of murder.  We can discuss the fine points about why murder is wrong whether based on Scripture or not.  However, when it comes down to a murder being committed murder is not what is on trial. The person who murdered is on trial. It is a person who will be punished for the sin of murder.  He is a murderer; you cannot separate the murder from the murderer.  Even after serving time in prison and “paying back society” he can be released but it will not take away the fact that he is a murderer. He can even repent, ask forgiveness and be forgiven by society yet he is still a murderer.

So where does this leave believers if God not only hates sin but also hates sinners?  Does God love us or hate us?  See even believers still sin so what is our hope? How do you reconcile that with God loved us while still sinners (Romans 5:8)?

 


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