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The Might Of Expository Preaching Power in the Spirit

I. BIBLICAL TEACHING

A. Understand the Spirit’s Power in Jesus’ Ministry

1. Luke 3:21-22

2. Luke 4:1-19

B. Understand the Spirit’s Promise in Jesus’ Commission

1. Luke 24:47-49

2. Acts 1:8

C. Understand the Spirit’s Power in the Apostles’ Ministry

1. Acts 2:4, 14-16

2. Acts 4:8-12

3. Acts 4:31

4. Acts 6:3-5

5. Acts 7:51-55

6. Acts 9:17-22

7. Acts 13:9-11

8. Acts 13:52-14:1

9. Colossians 1:29

 

II. HISTORICAL SUPPORT

A. Hear George Whitefield’s Dependence

B. Hear Charles Spurgeon’s Dependence

C. Hear Martyn Lloyd-Jones’s Dependence

 

III. PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

A. Be Saturated with Scripture

B. Be Steeped in the Truth

C. Be Pure before God

D. Be Surrendered to God

E. Be Separated from Unnecessary Influences

F. Be Submissive in Prayer

G. Be Pursuing God’s Glory

 

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The Manner Of Expository Preaching Passion in the Proclamation

I. LINGUISTIC MEANING

A. Understand the Definition of Passion

1. The passion of Christ – his suffering and death

2. The passion of the martyrs

3. The passion of pain

4. The passion of illness

5. To be acted upon, to be passive

6. To be moved

7. To be zealous

Feeling what we believe

B. Understand the Synonyms of Passion

1. Fervor

2. Fire

3. Zeal

4. Ardor

5. Enthusiasm

II. SPECIFIC ELEMENTS

A. Preach with Fervency

We need to be fiery. People are drawn to a man on fire.

B. Preach with Intensity

Sunlight focused through a magnifying glass, There is no such thing as a casual worship service. Undistracted.

C. Preach with Urgency

Now. Immediately. Critical importance. Exhorting. Encouraging. Two sermons by Spurgeon to read:

1. Now

2. Compel them to come in

 

III. BIBLICAL EXAMPLES

A. See Old Testament Examples of Passion

1. Jeremiah 9:1

2. Jeremiah 13:17

3. Jeremiah 20:9

4. Jeremiah 23:29

5. Jonah 3:2-4

 

B. See New Testament Examples of Passion

1. Matthew 9:36

2. John 7:37-38

3. Acts 4:2

4. Acts 13:5

5. Acts 20:31

6. Romans 9:1-3

7. Romans 10:1

8. 2 Corinthians 6:11

9. Colossians 1:28

 

IV. HISTORICAL VOICES

A. Hear Distant Voices

1. Martin Luther

2. Jonathan Edwards

Raise the affections of people for God, but only as high as truth will allow.

3. George Whitefield

The church is asleep.

4. James W. Alexander

5. Charles H. Spurgeon

B. Hear Recent Voices

1. John Murray

2. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

3. Geoffrey Thomas

V. PRACTICAL AIDS

A. Have a High View of God

View of God and passion in preaching are directly related.

B. Cultivate Deep Convictions in the Truth

C. Live with a Sense of Immediacy

A lecture can be given any time, a sermon must be preached now.

D. Develop a Deep Love for People

E. Be Filled by Holy Spirit

F. Be Gripped by Heaven and Hell

G. Read Inspiring Christian Biographies

H. Fellowship with Fervent Believers

Passion is contagious.

I. Pursue Communion with God

Prayer.

J. Desire to See People Saved

K. Preach to Responsive People

L. Confess All Your Sins

Sin is water poured on the fire.

M. Preach Through the Psalms

N. Understand What True Preaching Is

O. Listen to Passionate Preaching

P. Read Passionate Preaching

Q. Reflect Upon Your Calling

Remember where you were when God began to stir your heart.

R. Think Upon the Judgment Seat of Christ

Remember that the last day is coming, a day of accountability. Not only what we said but how we said it.

S. Gaze Upon the Cross

T. Ask God to Inflame Your Heart

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The Motivation Of Expository Preaching Practicality of the Truth

I. FIND THE TIMELESS PRINCIPLES

A. It Relates the Truth to Life

B. It Is Rooted in the Text

C. It Is Consistent with All Scripture

D. It Transcends All Cultures

E. It Addresses All Generations

 

II. KNOW YOUR LISTENERS

A. Know Human Nature

B. Know the Listener’s Needs

C. Know the Church’s Needs

D. Know the Current Issues

 

III. KNOW THE VARIOUS APPROACHES

A. Is There a Command to Obey?

B. Is There an Example to Follow?

C. Is There a Promise to Keep?

D. Is There a Principle to Implement?

E. Is There a Sin to Avoid?

F. Is There a Warning to Heed?

G. Is There a Reason to Praise?

H. Is There a Thanksgiving to Offer?

I. Is There a Truth to Defend?

J. Is There a Stand to Take?

K. Is There a Witness to Give?

 

IV. VARY THE APPROACH

A. Encourage Your Listeners Positively

B. Appeal to Your Listeners Tenderly

C. Invite Your Listeners Openly

D. Reason with Your Listeners Persuasively

E. Plead with Your Listeners Urgently

F. Warn Your Listeners Severely

G. Command Your Listeners Authoritatively

 

V. VARY THE MOOD OF THE VERBS

A. Use the Indicative Mood

B. Use the Interrogative Mood

C. Use the Imperative Mood

 

VI. VARY THE TONE

A. Speak Directly

B. Speak Softly

C. Speak Loudly

D. Speak Firmly

E. Speak Compassionately

F. Speak Slowly

G. Speak Swiftly

 

VII. VARY THE PRONOUNS

A. Speak with Third Person Plural

B. Move to First Person Plural

C. Move to Second Person Singular

 

VIII. ILLUSTRATE THE APPLICATION

A. Show It in Your Own Life

B. Show It in Another Life

C. Show It in a Biblical Character

D. Show It in a Historical Figure

 

IX. VARY THE PLACEMENT

A. Apply in the Introduction

B. Apply in the Main Body

C. Apply in the Conclusion

 

X. VARY THE FOCUS

A. Inform the Listener’s Mind of Their Duty

B. Inflame the Listener’s Affections for Their Duty

C. Influence the Listener’s Will to Their Duty

 

 

 

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The Meticulousness Of Expository Preaching Precision with the Text

I. LITERAL MEANING

A. Seek Plain Meaning

B. Seek Natural Meaning

C. Seek Obvious Meaning

 

II. AUTHORIAL INTENT

A. Discern the Writer’s Aim

B. Detect the Writer’s Audience

C. Discover the Writer’s Circumstances

 

III. BIBLICAL CONTEXT

A. In Which Testament Is This Found?

B. In What Canonical Section Is This Found?

C. What Is the Theme of This Biblical Book?

D. Where in the Book?

E. What Precedes This Text?

F. What Follows This Text?

G. What Parallels This Text?

 

IV. LITERARY GENRE

A. Note the Genre of the Passage

1. Prose

2. Wisdom

3. Song

4. Apocalyptic

5. Gospel

6. Legal

7. Parable

8. Sermon/Discourse

9. Epistle

 

B. Be Familiar with the Features of That Genre

1. Know Its Distinctives

2. Know Its Challenges

 

V. LEXICAL PRINCIPLE

A. Pinpoint the Key Words

1. Note Crucial Words

2. Note Repeating Words

3. Note Unclear Words

4. Note Emphatic Words

5. Note Alternating Words

 

B. Do Word Studies of These Words

1. Study Its Etymology

2. Study Its Biblical Usages

3. Study Its Extra-Biblical Usages

 

VI. GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE

A. Probe the Individual Words

1. Verbs

2. Nouns

3. Pronouns

4. Adjectives

5. Adverbs

6. Conjunctions

7. Participles

8. Infinitives

 

B. Probe the Collective Words

1. Clauses

2. Phrases

 

VII. GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION

A. Note the Places

1. Cities

2. Regions

3. Rivers

4. Seas

5. Territories

6. Mountains

7. Valleys

8. Wildernesses

9. Routes

10. Nations

B. Note the Distinctives

1. Location

2. Topography

3. Elevation

4. Weather

 

VIII. CULTURAL CONTEXT

A. Note the National Life

1. Political Practices

2. Social Customs

3. Economic Polices

4. Monetary Units

5. Military Warfare

 

B. Note the Spiritual Life

1. Religious Forms

2. Covenantal Agreements

 

C. Note the Natural Life

1. Climate Conditions

2. Agricultural Procedures

3. Native Plants

4. Indigenous Minerals

 

D. Note the Zoological Life

1. Nature Life

2. Animal Life

3. Shepherding Practices

4. Hunting Exploits

 

IX. FIGURATIVE SPEECH

A. Simile

B. Metaphor

C. Allegory

D. Metonymy

E. Synecdoche

F. Hyperbole

G. Personification

H. Apostrophe

I. Anthropomorphism

J. Hypocatastasis

K. Merimus

L. Zoomorphism

M. Ellipsis

N. Hendiadys

O. Inclusion

P. Eponymy

 

X. SYNTHETIC UNITY

A. Scripture Never Contradicts Itself

B. Scripture Always Harmonizes with Itself

C. Scripture Interprets Scripture

 

 

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Questions and Answers with Steve Lawson

Q:        What commentaries do you recommend?

There are sets and there are individual commentaries. Hendricksen and Kistemacker for the New Testament. MacArthur commentary set. Anything by James Montgomery Boice. The New American Commentary. The NICNT and NICOT by Erdmanns. Barnes Notes for the Old Testament. The Expositors Bible Commentary Set. Warren Weirsbe series. A.T. Robertson’s Word Pictures. The Bible Knowledge Commentary. The Pillar Commentary series. A.W. Pink on John and Hebrews. Charles Hodge on Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, the Treasury of David.

Q.        How about a Systematic Theology for non-scholars?

Lewis Berkhoff, Wayne Grudem, B.B. Warfield, Charles Ryrie, W.G.T. Shedd, A.A. Hodge, R.L. Dabney, Thomas Watson’s Body of Divinity.

Q.        Theological Dictionaries?

Intervarsity Theological Dictionary, Allen Cairnes

Q.        Lingustics?

Kittel.

Q.        Old Testament culture?

Alfred Eddersheim for the 1st Century.

Q.        On preaching?

Preaching by MacArthur, Preaching and Preachers by Lloyd-Jones, Power in the Pulpit by Jerry Vines, John Broadus on Preaching, The Expository Genius of John Calvin, Piper’s Supremacy of God in Preaching

Q.        Example preaching?

Charles Spurgeon, Whitefield, John Stott, Steven Oldford, Martyn Lloyd-Jones

Q.        What hills are worth dying on?

What would I be willing to be burned at the stake for? What the Bible is. The inspiration of scripture. The authority of scripture. The person of God. The person of Christ and his works. The person of the Holy Spirit. The Trinity. Heaven and Hell and the final judgment.

There are things that are very important as well: the doctrines of grace, church elders.

We need to be careful with cultural issues in that they can impair our ability to preach the gospel.

Q.        What advice to the lay preacher who is not trained as an expositor?

Start with easier portions of scripture. Concentrate on the main point. Chose a story. Follow an example.

Q.        Are there times that the passage of text does not dictate the structure of the sermon?

That is where the art part of expository preaching comes in.

Q.        What is your preaching load? How do you manage the load?

Typically four times a week. Sometimes the load is managed by teaching what was familiar. Let other men step in at times.

Q:      Do you ever vary the form of your sermons?

I always lay all my cards on the table at the beginning of the exposition.

Q:      Comment on the earlier sermons of Spurgeon being the best?

The earliest sermons are the like that the City of London had not heard in over a century. He had a simple life during those first years.

Q:      Where do you get feedback from?

You must consider the source as you consider the feedback you receive. Don’t allow yourself to be pulled down to the low level of some small-minded people. Most people who would give you feedback don’t understand preaching.

 

 

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The Mechanics Of Expository Preaching (II) Preparation of the Manuscript

IX. RECONSTRUCTION

THE FINAL VERSION OF WHAT WILL BE TAKEN INTO THE PULPIT.

A. Polish the Outline

A noticeable pattern to the outline. Use short outline points.

B. Rewrite the Manuscript

Internalize the material.

C. Tighten the Sentences

Shorten it up.

D. Streamline the Flow

No wild goose chases.

E. Sharpen the Vocabulary

F. Alternate the Words

G. Add Adjectives

H. Insert Adverbs

Right adjectives and adverbs arrest the attention of the hearers.

I. Improve the Transitions

Don’t allow the hearer to check out of a point when you are finished with it.

J. Shorten the Illustrations

Don’t spend a lot of time telling a story. State the purpose of the illustration.

X. INTRODUCTION

A. Read the Passage

Read the passage first. See 1 Tim. 4:13.

B. Capture the Interest

The hook. Make it so the people want to hear the sermon.

C. Show the Importance

Sell the sermon. Why this text is incredibly important.

D. State the Theme

Succinct. No surprises.

E. Review the Context

Brief as possible.

F. Preview the Headings

This shows forethought and organization.

 

XI. CONCLUSION

A. Drive Home the Truth

The central theme. Deals with the mind.

B. Raise the Affections

Deals with the emotion.

C. Encourage the Soul

Deals with the emotions

D. Challenge the Will

Deals with their will.

E. Transition to the Gospel

 

XII. INTERNALIZATION

GET YOUR MESSAGE INTO YOU.

A. Mark Up Your Manuscript

1. Underline Key Words

2. Highlight Key Sentences

3. Circle Key Thoughts

B. Write in Your Bible

1. Underline Key Words

2. Scribble Key Words

C. Pray Over Your Notes

Preach it to God first.

1. Confess Your Sins

Apply the applications to yourself first.

2. Ask for Grace

3. Intercede for the Listeners

 

XIII. INSPIRATION

A. Read Inspiring Literature

1. Read Christian Biography

2. Read Church History

3. Read Martyr Accounts

4. Read Puritan Books

5. Read Spurgeon Sermons

 

B. Read Inspiring Passages

1. Read Four Gospels

2. Read Book of Acts

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The Models Of Expository Preaching Preachers in the Scripture

I. MOSES (DEUTERONOMY 1, 4-5)

A. He Expounded the Law (1:5)

B. He Taught the Law (4:1)

C. He Commanded the Law (4:2, 5)

D. He Applied the Law (5:1-8)

 

II. EZRA (NEHEMIAH 8 )

A. His Exposition Was Bible-Centered (3a)

B. His Exposition Was Lengthy (3b)

C. His Exposition Was Authoritative (4-5)

D. His Exposition Was God-Exalting (6a)

E. His Exposition Was Affection-Raising (6b)

F. His Exposition Was Exegetical (7-8)

 

III. JESUS (MATTHEW 5-7)

A. He Upheld the Scripture (5:17-19)

B. He Read the Text (5:21, 27, 31, 33, 38, 43)

C. He Explained the Text (5:22, 28, 31, 34-36, 39, 44-45)

D. He Applied the Text (5:23-26, 29-30, 37, 40-42, 46-48)

E. He Summoned the Lost (7:13-27)

 

IV. PETER (ACTS 2:16-40)

A. He Read the Text (16-21)

1. Joel 2:28-32

B. He Explained the Text (22-24)

1. Jesus Is This Lord

2. Jesus Was Attested by God (22)

3. Jesus Was Crucified (23)

4. Jesus Was Raised

C. He Supported the Text (25-35)

1. He Cited Psalm 16:8-11

2. He Cited Psalm 132:11

3. He Cited Psalm 110:1

D. He Cited Synthesized the Text (36)

1. Jesus Is Lord

2. Jesus Is Christ

E. He Cited Applied the Text (37-40)

1. Repent of Your Sins (37-39)

2. Receive the Word (40)

 

V. PAUL (1 TIMOTHY 4:13)

A. He Urged Reading the Text (13a)

B. He Urged Teaching the Text (13c)

C. He Urged Applying the Text (13b)

 

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Questions and Answers with John MacArthur

Q.        Why are you compelled to preach sequentially through books in the Bible?

Every word is profitable, every word is inspired. This is a mandate. Sequential preaching creates context.

Q.        How do you pull together an expository sermon?

There is no magic. Overview the entire book. Read commentaries you trust. Find a unit to preach on. Read it. Find out what it says. Then find out what it means. Use theological commentaries. Find cross references. Explore the doctrine behind the central theme. Frame the outline. Then prepare an introduction and a conclusion.

Q.        Becoming the kind of preacher God wants you to be?

Put all other things aside – leadership training, etc. Preaching demands our best effort. Set a good pace and keep up the pace you set. Don’t lose heart, falling into sin.

Q.        Important issues in setting the gospel before people?

Do not import things into the text which are not there. Exposit the elements of the gospel that are in the text. A superficial presentation of the gospel which is not tied to the text is an affront to the hearers.

Q.        How to get to the next level in preaching?

Admit that you don’t have enough to say. Find people who know a lot more than you do. Read. Build a library. Be a selective reader. You will only be as good as your material.

Q.        How to interface preaching demands and family time?

It is not about structuring time or an external requirement. It is about an investment. Then there are primary responsibilities. Everything else fits in the cracks. It takes being surrounded with gifted people. Expositors attract like-minded people.

Q.        The preaching of the word is the controlling factor in worship?

Preaching today is about evoking a superficial, emotional worship. The preaching is superficial, so the worship is superficial. If you hear profound theology being sung in the church it is because the congregation has been given a diet of profound theology from the pulpit.

 

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The Mechanics Of Expository Preaching (I) Preparation of the Manuscript

There is an art and a science in preparing an expository sermon.

I. PREPARATION

PRELIMINARY THINGS ARE NECESSARY. CERTAIN THINGS MUST BE IN PLACE.

A. Sanctify Your Life

Prepare our own heart. Humility, prayer, confession, asking for direction, enlightenment, help from the Holy Spirit, enthusiasm.

B. Select the Text

Obviously. Every text is a treasure-house. Select the appropriate division of the text.

C. Secure the Resources

Gather the books. Isolate the resources. Get it in a form you can write on. Extract the gold. See where you need to drill down more. Be greedy at this point. Get the whole choir in front of you. Have all the clubs in your bag laid out.

Quiet place. Good lighting. Good chair. Large desk.

D. Seek the Lord

 

II. OBSERVATION

A. Read the Passage

Over and over again. Mark it up. Be aggressive. Investigate the text. Make observations. Be driven into the text. Look for key words, main verbs, conjunctions.

B. Investigate the Text

1. Who Is Speaking?

The text will not make sense unless you know who wrote it.

2. Where Is He?

3. When Did He Write This?

4. To Whom Is He Speaking?

5. Why Is He Speaking?

6. What Else Was Occurring?

7. What Preceded It?

8. What Follows?

C. Note the Features

Figures of speech, proper names, parallelism.

D. Discover the Thrust

Discover the central theme. We must have a message with unity. All planets revolve around this sun.

III. ORIENTATION

A. Read the Various Commentaries

Rely on work others have done before you in the past. Start with the simplest and work up to the most difficult.

B. Construct a Block Diagram

Subject-Verb-Object. Focus on the verbs.

C. Discover the Issues

Cause and effect. Repetition.

D. Consider the Proper Meaning

The right interpretation. Who has nailed the right interpretation?

IV. CRYSTALLIZATION

A. Write a Simple Outline

Summarize the outline and the main idea. Anticipate what your preaching outline is going to be. You need the railroad tracks that the sermon is going to go down.

B. Write the Central Theme

One sentence. What is the text about? Study Bibles are very helpful.

 

V. CONSTRUCTION

WRITE THE MANUSCRIPT. YOU MUST PREACH ENOUGH IN ORDER TO BECOME A GOOD PREACHER.

A. Write the First Heading

Skip the introduction. Save it until later. Start with Roman numeral I. Read, explain, apply, maybe illustrate.

B. Write the Transition

Set up the first verse.

C. Write the First Verse

D. Write the Explanation

Use the dictionary and the thesaurus.

 

VI. EXPLORATION

A. Dig Deeper into the Text

1. Word Studies

2. Verb Tenses

3. Grammatical Structure

4. Syntax

5. Historical Background

6. Geographical Setting

7. Authorial Intent

8. Figurative Speech

9. Cross References

10. Book Argument

11. Systematic Theology

Tell the people what they cannot normally pull out from the text.

 

B. Incorporate the Additional Findings

1. Write It in the Manuscript

2. Merge It with These Findings

 

VII. APPLICATION

APPLY AS YOU GO, AS CLOSE TO THE EXPLANATION AS POSSIBLE. GET TO THE “YOU”. READ THE FACES OF PEOPLE.

A. Show the Relevance

You don’t have to make the Bible what it already is. You SHOW the relevance, not MAKE the relevance.

B. Relate the Implications

C. Urge the Following

This is the implementation.

 

VIII. ILLUSTRATIONS

MOST ILLUSTRATIONS TAKE TOO LONG. THE BEST ILLUSTRATIONS ARE BIBLICAL ILLUSTRATIONS. ALSO HISTORICAL ILLUSTRATIONS ARE GOOD. NOT YOUR FAMILY. NOT YOUR CAT. LIMITED PERSONAL ILLUSTRATIONS. WE ARE NOT THE HERO.

A. Use Biblical Illustrations

B. Use Historical Illustrations

C. Use Personal Illustrations

D. Use Cultural Illustrations

Some cultural illustrations are good to create a crisis in the pulpit and then solve it in the sermon.

E. Use Created Illustrations

Like Pilgrim’s Progress.

F. Use Quotations

They shouldn’t take much time.

G. Use analogies and metaphors

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The Marks Of Expository Preaching (II) Priorities in the Pulpit

VI. THEOLOGICALLY-PRECISE

EVERY TEXT FITS WITHIN THE LARGER CONTEXT OF THE ENTIRE BIBLE. THE EXPOSITOR MUST BE A THEOLOGIAN. ALL OF SCRIPTURE MUST BE BROUGHT TO BEAR ON A GIVEN TEXT. THIS MUST BE DONE WITHOUT ABANDONING THE PRIMARY TEXT.

A. Exposition Is Grounded in Biblical Theology

1. Same Book

2. Same Author

3. Same Genre

4. Same Testament

B. Exposition Is Grounded in Systematic Theology

1. Bibliology

What the Bible teaches about itself.

2. Theology Proper

The study of God, attributes, names, trinity.

3. Christology

The person of Christ, incarnation, hypostatic union, obedience, substitutionary death.

4. Pneumatology

The doctrine of the Holy Spirit.

5. Angelology

Angels.

6. Anthropology

Man.

7. Harmartiology

Sin, depravity, the fall.

8. Soterology

The doctrine of salvation, the order of salvation.

9. Ecclesiology

The nature of the church.

10. Eschatology

The last things.

 

Give theology in condensed form, easy to retain. Cite the passages. Preaching is theology on fire. A theology which does not catch fire is a defective theology. Preaching must always be theological, not practical. Never let the patient write the prescription.

Why theological preaching has declined:

1) laziness of the preacher;

2) the love of popularity;

3) superficial evangelism.

 

C. Exposition Is Sharpened by Historical Theology

1. Church Fathers

2. Medieval Period

3. Pre-Reformation

4. Reformation

5. Puritan Age

6. Evangelical Revival

7. Modern Church

 

VII. LOGICALLY-ORDERED

NOT A RANDOM COLLECTION OF WORD STUDIES AND COMMENTARIES. STRUCTURED DEVELOPMENT OF THOUGHT.

A. Exposition Is Reasonably Coherent

1. Introduction

2. Central Theme

 A laser beam which runs through the entirety of the sermon. All points hang on the central theme.

3. Main Headings

4. Subordinate Parts

5. Sequential Development

6. Transitions

 Between points and between exposition and applications.

 7. Conclusion

 Build to a crescendo.

B. Exposition Is Recognizably Attractive

1. It Is Symmetrical in Balance

Balance in points. A definite form. Clear divisions.

2. It Is Simplistic in Clarity

3. It Is Symphonic in Parts

 

VIII. PASSIONATELY-DELIVERED

PREACHING IS NOT LECTURING. IT IS NOT DELIVERED MONOTONE WITH NO MOTION. SEE LUKE 24:32. PASSION AND UNCTION.

A. Exposition Is Compelling in Its Presentation

1. Voice Inflection

2. Eye Focus

3. Body Posture

4. Hands Gesture

5. Emphatic Words

6. Dramatic Pauses

7. Paced Delivery

8. Facial Countenance

 

B. Exposition Is Contagious in Its Spread

1. It Enflames Hearts

2. It Raises Affections

3. It Inspires Hope

4. It Challenges Wills

 

IX. BOLDLY-DECLARED

NEVER APOLOGIZE FOR YOUR POINTS. BOLDNESS IS LITERALLY “ALL-SPEECH.” SAY EVERYTHING THAT NEEDS TO BE SAID. NO RESERVATION, NO AMBIGUITY. NO CODE LANGUAGE. IF YOU GET IN TROUBLE, IT IS NOT BECAUSE YOU WEREN’T UNDERSTAND, IT IS BECAUSE YOU WERE UNDERSTOOD.

A. Exposition Requires Speaking Out

1. It Speaks Fully

2. It Speaks Openly

3. It Speaks Courageously

Confidence. All of Christianity is a religion of assertions. The lightning bolt must come down. See Tit. 1:9, 2:15.

B. Exposition follows Biblical Examples

1. Acts 4:29

2. Acts 13:44-47

3. 2 Corinthians 3:12

4. Ephesians 6:19

5. 1 Thessalonians 2:2

 

X. PASTORALLY-EDIFYING

WE ARE NOT A STEAMROLLER, WE ARE CALLED TO BE SHEPHERDS OF THE FLOCK. WE NOT ONLY TEAR DOWN, BUT WE BUILD UP. WE HAVE THE SWORD AND THE TROWEL. BOTH HANDS MUST BE OCCUPIED. THIS IS A MEANING OF THE SHARP TWO-EDGED SWORD. PREACH TO BROKEN HEARTS AND YOU WILL NEVER LACK FOR A CONGREGATION.

A. Exposition Emulates Biblical Images

1. Feeding Shepherd

Speak kindly. Exhibit patience.

2. Nursing Mother

1 Thes. 2. Some need encouragement, some need admonishment.

3. Imploring Father

1 Thes. 2 again.

4. Humble Servant

We do not lord it over the flock. We are not to be overbearing.

B. Exposition Ministers in Different Ways

See 1 Thes. 5.

1. It Admonishes the Wayward

2. It Encourages the Worried

3. It Helps the Weak

We are preaching to people.

 

XI. EVANGELISTICALLY-AIMED

PREACH THE WORD. DO THE WORK OF AN EVANGELIST. EVEN WITHIN THE CHURCH.

A. Exposition Preaches the Law

No one wants to be saved until they know that they are lost.

1. It Exposes Sin

2. It Reveals Need

3. It Threatens Wrath

4. It Facilitates Conviction

B. Exposition Presents the Gospel

1. It Preaches Christ

2. It Offers Grace

3. It Extends Forgiveness

4. It Preaches the Necessity of the New Birth

C. Exposition Persuades the Lost

1. It Urges Repentance

2. It Summons Faith

We do not shy away from preaching judgment, condemnation, damnation, hell and torment.

 

The Institute for Expository Preaching whole series


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