Tag Archive | College

And Then They Are All Mine

Here is a Sodom that parents often don’t hesitate to send their children to – alone.  The below are professor’s quotes from Al Mohler’s article.  Better read this if you have children approaching college age.

“And Then They Are All Mine” — The Real Agenda of Some College Professors

“We need to encourage everyone to be in college for as many years as they possibly can,” this professor wrote, “in the hope that somewhere along the line they might get some exposure to the world outside their town, and to moral ideas not exclusively derived from their parents’ religion. If they don’t get this in college, they’re not going to get it anywhere else.”

“The children of red states will seek a higher education,” he explains, “and that education will very often happen in blue states or blue islands in red states. For the foreseeable future, loyal dittoheads will continue to drop off their children at the dorms. After a teary-eyed hug, Mom and Dad will drive their SUV off toward the nearest gas station, leaving their beloved progeny behind.”

Then what? He proudly claims: “And then they are all mine.”

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We “dittoheads” had better be aware of where we are sending our children the Lord entrusted to us.



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The Timing of College?

Who doesn’t know an individual that after attending college right after high school and getting their degree decided to return to college for a totally different career field?

Many juniors and seniors have ideas of what they want to be as adults and will direct their education in that direction but often their ideas are based little on the facts of a career. Very few get the opportunity to really see what their planned work will really be like. You know, the pre-med or nursing student who faints at the sight of blood. The accountant that can’t stand looking at numbers all day.

Children mature at much different rates. While some teens are prepared to make lifelong decisions many are more interested in what outfit to wear. Public school pushes the idea that a certain age child should have reached certain goals. Not all 5 year olds are ready for Kindergarten, not all first and second graders are ready for reading. And contrary to popular opinion not all seniors in high school are ready for college and the independence associated with it.

Homeschooling generally prepares teens better for the more independent studies of college. I said generally because all parents homeschool differently. Some parents are more hands-on and directing about a teens education while others assign work and supervise but allow the student more independence similar to college.

But even if a child is prepared for the academics and the less directed studies in college, all high school graduates are not mature enough for the college environment. This is where a parent can be most helpful. Parents should know their children well enough to determine if their child is easily influenced by others, peers and/or teachers. Use to be worrying about negative peer influences was the biggest concern, yet today there is just as much concern about the negative influence of teachers. Homeschooled children are often accused of being gullible and easily swayed by others. I’m sure that there are some homeschooled students that are like that, just as there are some public schooled students like that. But generally most homeschooled students are independently minded enough not to believe everything they are told, especially if parents have taught them to analyze false claims and advertising gimmicks. Also many parents work at preparing their students to be discerning and to determine the truth of what they hear no matter who said it.

What is a parent to do if they realize their child is not prepared for college?

Should a student attend college and hope to settle on a major while attending?

Has your child any real idea what their declared major is like in real life? Here is where an internship would be invaluable if it is an unpaid job.

What if your student is not academically ready for college level classes? The child that has to be constantly reminded to get projects in on time or forgets about things until the day they are due will struggle in college.

What if your child is not mentally ready for the peer pressure and influence of questionable teachers?

These are several things to consider in relation to college for high school graduates.

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I Work So My Children Can Go to College – Is College that Important?

College seems to be pushed as the ultimate cap to childhood. Children have not grown up until they have gone to college for a few years and gotten a degree. But what is the purpose of college?

Is the goal of college a well rounded education?

Is college just an extension of the teen years, more freedom and less demands?

Is the goal of college to be able to make more money than flipping burgers at McDonalds?

Is college for finding a spouse?

Is college an extension of the high school sports playing?

Is college for receiving a degree and a piece of paper to hang on the wall?

Is college required in order to obtain the necessary credentials for a chosen career path?

Is having a college degree a matter of pride, a notch in your belt, which says you are important?

Have you really sat down and contemplated why or if your child should attend college?

Cannot many of the reasons for college be met in different ways with much less expense?

See when I was a young mother one of the first things others stressed is that you shouldn’t have too many children, nor have them too close together, because then how would you be able to afford college. Honestly, the issue was of a little concern then, but not something I stressed about, now I know that the Lord will provide for ALL our needs. We even at one time signed up for the PACT (Prepaid Affordable College Tuition) college funding available in our state, which is now defaulting. After signing the papers with a salesman who came to our home, we had 30 days to review the papers before it was final. But upon closer reading we found that what we were going to have to pay would be so limited in what we could do with it and really it was only a savings account regulated by the government. It wouldn’t cover out of state schools, had problems if we moved across state lines, and was really restricted if my preschooler at the time was not intending to go to college upon graduation. We dropped that and haven’t regretted it at all. Especially after the issue our state has had this past year with PACT funding for colleges, the year our oldest was eligible.

Throughout high school we were not only encouraged to attend college but we were seriously recruited from the colleges. We were taught that anybody worth anything would attend college. Only those who desired to be live in poverty or live off the government wouldn’t attend college and get a good supporting career (only possible with a degree supposedly). But is that true? No, it isn’t true at all. That is just one of the many lies the public school system will strive to convince students.

Another lie that is fostered by the college mentality is that young people should finish college before getting married. Only red-necks and country bumpkins got married right out of high school; intelligent people waited until after college. It didn’t matter if you had been dating the same person for three or four years during high school (courtship and not dating weren’t popular then); you still needed to wait until you graduated from college. College was more important than marriage. Need I point out the issues this causes!

So one of the first things for parents to determine is what prominence a college education holds in the life of their family. Is it a requirement or it is dependent on the actual career choices of the child? What if your son desires to do carpentry? What if your daughter just desires to be a homemaker? Now of course if your other son feels called to be a surgeon he will have a decade of college ahead of him. But will one be more highly favored just due to the college education?

Must mothers give up being home with their children in order to pay the outlandish prices for a college education? Which will have more influence on a child, eighteen years of an available mother or four years of college?

Is the Lord more concerned with the externals of a college education or with the internals of the heart?


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College and Debt

Many may have thought that discouraging college loans and large college expenses was not practical in today’s world. How many times have I heard the excuse given for getting in debt for college is that the college degree will pay back the loans and debt in excess?

Well here is the truth straight from Business Week.

MBA Pay: Riches for Some, Not All

While some grads make hundreds of thousands, others make a pittance while they start their own companies, and still others are unemployed. No matter how you look at it, the fantastic notion of a diploma being an express ticket to a big company’s corner office is probably just that — fantasy.

But isn’t a college degree necessary to do well in life?

Nope.

Michael Dell, who started Dell Computers, dropped out of college at 19 to be able to run the business he had already started.

Bill Gates attended Harvard mostly so he could have access to their computer systems. He was just haphazardly taking courses. After having begun college, he got his parents to agree that he could stop in order to start his business Microsoft, he never returned to college.

Or how about Milton Hershey who with only a fourth grade education started Hershey’s.

Ty Warner the creator of Beanie Babies also did not have a college education.

Now granted there are several fields in which a college degree is required, particularly in medicine. But there are ways to acquire the required degree without being burdened down with debt. There is the military option of getting a degree. The military will pay for college and even living expenses for certain fields that they have need of such as engineers and medical. After college, the student then serves in the military for a few years.

Many hospitals will help pay for college for their entry level employees. So a person could start out as a nursing assistant and work their way through several levels by having their job pay for the additional schooling.

Another source of educational funding is the Underserved Areas system. In this those typically going into the medical fields of nursing, dentistry, or doctors can have their education paid for them. Upon graduation they are stationed in an Underserved area for a particular number of years. Areas such as rural areas, the Appalachians, or Indian Reservations are the typical Underserved locations.

There are many different ways to acquire a College degree if that is what the Lord will have you or your child do. All without incurring debt. But a college degree is not as necessary as the college systems have been leading us to believe.

Colleges are a big industry in the US. Maybe even the biggest we have. It is in the college systems best interest to convince everyone that college is required to succeed in life. However, the last thing any parent needs is debt and a college educated fool who says, “There is no God.” So many colleges make it their goal to disparage a student’s faith in God because an “educated person couldn’t believe such silliness.

Psalms 53:1 The fool says in his heart, “There is no God.” ESV

Proverbs 17:16 Why should a fool have money in his hand to buy wisdom when he has no sense? ESV


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Modesty Irrelevant in College?

Modesty ‘irrelevant’ at Univ. of Chicago

The university announced the decision to parents in a letter that was sent in mid-December. The change in boarding rules will allow students of the opposite sex to reside in the same room, and the school says the decision was born from a student-led initiative. Students who wish to have a coed roommate will not need parental consent.

Laurie Higgins, the director of the division of school advocacy with the Illinois Family Institute, calls the decision troubling, but not surprising. “I think it reflects a number of troubling assumptions: One is that sex differences are irrelevant, that modesty is irrelevant — and modesty is not equivalent to prudery — that parental values and beliefs are irrelevant,” she notes.

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