Tag Archive | Conference

Sacred Harp Singing – Losing Its Heart

This weekend we attended the National Sacred Harp Convention in the Birmingham, Alabama area. I enjoyed getting to hear the style singing that I grew up listening to. Although I found I was seriously out of practice. I could not sing as fast as they did.

The National Convention draws some of the best Sacred Harp singers from around the world.

There were around a dozen singers from the UK, lots from Canada, one lady was from Holland, and many from all over the USA. Singers drove or flew from Oregon, Montana, New York, and California. There was one lady that has flown from England for ten years for this conference.

We didn’t see anyone we really knew this year. Most of the older individuals aren’t able to travel any longer or else they have passed away. We saw several that we are familiar with but really don’t know, many that are part of promoting Sacred Harp Singing nationally. And of course there was the eclectic older individual man that is a regular each year. You never know what to expect from him. I guess you would call him a modern day hippy. The day we saw him he wore shorts, a printed shirt, black knee high socks, and some kind of rolled beret hat. The day before he was proudly wearing a NO WAR shirt.

That was a symptom of a larger problem which I have noticed for years but never so much as this year. What is the problem? The fact that although in some ways Sacred Harp Singing is thriving and being introduced to more and more younger generations, it has lost its heart.

What do I mean about losing its heart?

The National Convention has become a singing for the sake of singing and promoting Sacred Harp singing. But the real reason for singing is lost, just like Christmas today has no evidence of the purpose intended. The heart of Sacred Harp singing is worshiping our Lord, singing praise to His name and His wonderful provisions for us. But that was missing. Now granted there were those there that were singing to praise and worship the Lord, particularly the older individuals. But many, many were there to sing a style of music and they had never caught the reason for the singing.

Sacred Harp singing was a method of learning to sing notes and carry tunes in order that hymn singing in worship services might be beautiful praise to the Lord. It was developed at a time when reading music was not known by the general population and tunes were sung differently in different churches just from memory.

Within a generation or two, the Puritans forgot many of their psalm tunes, and the pace of singing slowed. Lining out, a practice in which a clerk or precentor sang or read a line followed by the people’s singing of that line, gradually became more popular. This call-response pattern and the slowed tempo encouraged individuals to improvise their own variations on the psalm tunes ever more loudly in an increasingly cacophonous sea of sound. Ministers like Thomas Walter found this “singing by rote” intolerable and began in the second and third decades of the eighteenth century to argue for a return to “regular singing.” By 1800 the practice of “lining out” had died in New England and moved South, more of its own accord than by argument, but concern for “regular singing” helped to create singing schools.

Dictionary of Christianity in America

So villanous had church-singing at last become that the clergymen arose in a body and demanded better performances; while a desperate and disgusted party was also formed which was opposed to all singing. Still another band of old fogies was strong in force who wished to cling to the same way of singing that they were accustomed to; and they gave many objections to the new-fangled idea of singing by note, the chief item on the list being the everlasting objection of all such old fossils, that “the old way was good enough for our fathers,” &c. They also asserted that “the names of the notes were blasphemous;” that it was “popish;” that it was a contrivance to get money; that it would bring musical instruments into the churches; and that “no one could learn the tunes any way.”

Sabbath In Puritan New England by Alice Morse Earle

So Sacred Harp singing developed as a way to teach the hymns and tunes to the congregations in order that the hymn singing could be done “decently and in order”.

If you visit a small Sacred Harp singing in a church there is often praying and testimonies given during the singing. Even the songs attest to the Lord’s Grace and faithfulness to us worthless sinners. Although the singings may be doing the right things and saying the right words, they are becoming lacking in the truly important things – worshiping the Lord with all the heart and spirit.

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History Of the English Bible

A collection of antique Bibles will be on display in Gadsden, Alabama this summer.

Friday, July 3rd, 2009 until Friday, August, 19, 2009

This exhibit will feature a display of historically significant and interesting Bibles.

The following is a partial list of Bibles which will be on display during the exhibit.

Latin Vulgate

1580 Latin Vulgate, London, England
1868 Latin Vulgate

Wycliffe Bible

1380 Wycliffe New Testament, reprinted 1810
1382 Wycliffe New Testament, reprinted 1986
Wycliffe Bible, reprinted 1850
1450-1455 Gutenberg Latin Vulgate, reprinted 1960

Tyndale New Testament

1526 Tyndale New Testament, reprinted 1837
1526 Tyndale New Testament, reprinted
1535 Coverdale Bible, reprinted 1847

Geneva Bible

1599 Geneva New Testament, printed by Christopher Barker, London, England
1599 Geneva New Testament, printed by Christopher Barker, London, England
1615 Geneva Bible, printed by Robert Barker, London, England
1585 Bishop’s Bible

1590 English/Arabic Bible

Douay-Rheims Bible

King James Bible

1616 King James Version, printed by Robert Barker, London, England
1625 King James Version, printed by Norton & Bill, London, England
1629 King James Version, printed by Thomas and John Buck, Cambridge, England
1768 King James Version, printed by John Bill Barker, London, England (ruled in red)
1782 Aitken Bible (King James Version), 1968 reprint
1814 King James Version, printed by William W. Woodward, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1842 English Hexapla

1901 American Standard Version (First Edition)

1935 The Holy Bible, A New Translation (Moffat Bible)

1939 The Complete Bible, An American Translation (Goodspeed)

1943 New Testament in Modern Speech (Weymouth Bible)

Family Bibles

1869 King James Version “Family Bible”, published by the United States Publishing Co.
1892 Parallel King James Version/Revised Version “Family” Bible, published by American Wringer Co., New York

Gadsden Museum of Art
515 Broad St.
Gadsden, AL 35901

This will coincide with:

History of the Indestructible Book

2009 Gadsden Conference on the English Bible

A hands on look at the antique Bibles will be given during the Conference.

Please pre-register for seating arraignments.
July 17 and 18, 2009

 

Ink & Blood

Now until October 31, 2009


So if driving to Gadsden, Alabama isn’t too far, consider a trip for one or more of these summertime Bible events. Only the Ink & Blood has a fee (approximately $6). The others are free.

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History of the Indestructible Book

History of the Indestructible Book
2009 Gadsden Conference on the English Bible

Friday and Saturday, July 17 and 18, 2009.

There is no cost to attend this conference.
(But please pre-register so adequate seating can be arranged.)

Mary G. Hardin Center for Cultural Arts
501 Broad Street
Gadsden, Alabama 35901

Speakers are from Reformed Churches, Primitive Baptist Churches, Southern Baptist Churches and Presbyterian Churches.

Friday, July 17 Printable Brochure

12:00 PM Registration Opens
12:30 PM Welcome and Introduction / Historical Translation Challenges ~ Michael Rogers
1:30 PM Why the History of the Bible is Important ~ Matthew Carpenter
2:30 PM The English Bible before 1611 ~ Lyn Caudle
3:30 PM Break
4:00 PM The 1611 King James Bible ~ Anthony Copeland
5:00 PM Dinner Break (on your own)
7:00 PM John Wycliffe – Star of the Reformation ~ Dr. George Ella
8:00 PM Question and Answer Session
8:30 PM Dismiss

Saturday, July 18 Printable Brochure

8:00 AM Registration Opens
8:30 AM The English Bible after 1611 ~ Ricky Tillis
9:30 AM John Albert Bengel – Father of Modern Biblical Scholarship ~ Dr. George Ella
11:00 AM Museum Exhibit Grand Opening
12:00 PM Lunch Break (on your own)
1:00 PM Viewing of Exhibits / Ink and Blood
2:30 PM Special Session – Children and Youth with Dr. Ella ~ Dr. George Ella
3:00 PM Modern Translation Challenges: A Case Study ~ Bob Hamilton
4:00 PM Canonization of the Scriptures ~ Steve Cowan
5:30 PM Diner Break (on your own)
7:00 PM William Tyndale – Heir of God through Christ’s Deservings ~ Dr. George Ella
8:00 PM Question and Answer Session
8:30 PM Dismiss

This Conference is a joint effort by several church denominations, The City of Gadsden and Gadsden State Community College.

Partners:

Mary G. Hardin Center for Cultural Arts
Gadsden Museum of Art
Gadsden State Community College
Gadsden Public Library
Ink and Blood – Dead Sea Scrolls to Gutenberg
Chattanooga Primitive Baptist Church
Dominion Baptist Church
Etowah Baptist Association
Fellowship Baptist Church (Cleveland, AL)
Fellowship Primitive Baptist Church (McDonough, GA)
Gadsden Primitive Baptist Church
Grace Fellowship Community Church
Harvest Fellowship Community Church
Heritage Primitive Baptist Church
Immanuel Baptist Church (no website link)

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My Favorite Quote from The Holiness of God Conference

R. C. Sproul in his session on Saturday titled A Consuming Fire: Holiness, Wrath and Justice was talking about Uzzah.

2 Sam 6:1-10
1 David again gathered all the chosen men of Israel, thirty thousand.
2 And David arose and went with all the people who were with him from Baale-judah to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who sits enthroned on the cherubim.
3 And they carried the ark of God on a new cart and brought it out of the house of Abinadab,
which was on the hill. And Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, were driving the new cart,
4 with the ark of God, and Ahio went before the ark.
5 And David and all the house of Israel were making merry before the Lord, with songs and lyres and harps and tambourines and castanets and cymbals.
6 And when they came to the threshing floor of Nacon, Uzzah put out his hand to the ark of God and took hold of it, for the oxen stumbled.
7 And the anger of the Lord was kindled against Uzzah, and God struck him down there because of his error, and he died there beside the ark of God.
8 And David was angry because the Lord had burst forth against Uzzah. And that place is called Perez-uzzah, to this day.
9 And David was afraid of the Lord that day, and he said, “How can the ark of the Lord come to me?”
10 So David was not willing to take the ark of the Lord into the city of David. But David took it aside to the house of Obed-edom the Gittite.
ESV

Sproul discussed how this story if ever mentioned is explained away and very few want to look at it seriously.

Sproul’s explanation was the best I’ve heard:

Uzzah assumed that contact with the mud would be worse than contact with his hand.

How can mud and dirt be worse than the hands of a sinful, depraved man?

Mud is cleaner and holier than we are!



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Ligonier Ministries Summaries of Conference

Ligonier Ministries also has summaries of The Holiness of God Conference sessions.

Ligonier National Conference – Ligon Duncan – Calvin and the Christian Life

Piety for Calvin was short-hand for the whole practice and faith of the Christian life. Calvin did not call his Institutes a sum of Christian theology but rather a sum of piety. Yes, Calvin’s institutes was an engagement on the truth of God’s word, but it was for the sake of producing piety.

What is meant by piety? Two things: (1) An experiential love for God as Father. And (2) a fear and reverence for Him as our Lord. The term “religion” has negative connotations for some — it conveys a formalized, external, even hypocritical life. Not so for John Calvin. For Calvin, “religion” is faith joined with fear and reverence for God. For Calvin, piety is reverence joined with the love of God which the knowledge of God’s benefits induces.

Ligonier National Conference – Steve Lawson – The Legacy of John Calvin

Calvin was the architect of reformed theology — he was the standard even in his day. Luther was a volcano, spewing out numerous fiery ideas. But Calvin was the systematizer — he arranged and ordered the theology of the Reformation. Lloyd-Jones that apart from Calvin, the Reformation would have died out by the end of the 16th century.

Ligonier National Conference – R.C. Sproul, Jr. – Train Up Your Children: Family Worship of the Holy God

But what if you’re too busy? Then stop being too busy. What is it that could possibly be more important? The transcendent God is inviting you to walk with Him in the cool of the evening. Will you say to Him: Thanks for the invitation, but I’ve got an important meeting? Nobody is too busy to draw near to the living God. Nobody is too busy to give up that which is less rewarding for the Source of all joy. Our problem is, as C.S. Lewis said, that we’re too easily pleased. We don’t properly esteem the value and the joy of what God sets before us.

Ligonier National Conference – Sinclair Ferguson (II) – Hallowed Be Your Name: The Holiness of the Father

There are two dimensions running through John’s gospel. On the one hand, we see the Eternal Son of God addressing the Father as Holy Father. What does it mean that from all eternity there has been this response of the Eternal Son to the Eternal Father such that He addresses Him as “Holy Father.” For something to be an attribute of God it must have been, in action, expressed among the three persons of the Trinity. [God expresses wrath, but strictly speaking it is not an attribute of God, because in the blessed Trinity there is no manifestation of it. Rather, wrath is a temporary manifestation of God’s holiness in response to sin.]

Ligonier National Conference – Steve Lawson (II) -The Holy One of God: The Holiness of Jesus

Look again at the title,”The Holy One of God.” This is a formal, technical title. “The Holy One of God” is a formal title for God in the book of Isaiah. No less than 26 times in the book of Isaiah we find this title for Jehovah God: “The Holy One of God.” It is picked up in Ezekiel, Psalms, and elsewhere. So when this demon says, “I know who you are, the Holy One of God,” the identity is unquestionable. The identity was assigned to God in the Old Testament, and it is assigned to Jesus in the New Testament. That is what is taking place — from the lips of a demon-possessed man.

Ligonier National Conference – D.A. Carson – A Holy Nation: The Church’s High Calling

When Paul in Romans 15 discusses his evangelism, it is called a “priestly service”. We become priests not because we have some peculiar role (e.g., full-time ministry), but because as Christians we are to pray for those outside and to present the living God’s gospel to them. Talking to an unbeliever is a priestly act of mediation. We are all priests in this sense; believers are built into a spiritual priesthood. We all have access to God. There are not two standards of holiness on this side of the cross. We are all a part of the priesthood (what a privilege!) of the King of the universe.

Ligonier National Conference – Derek Thomas – Be Ye Holy: The Necessity of Sanctification

It is one thing to talk about the holiness of God and another thing to long for holiness in our own life. Consider the “third use” of the law (as a guide). Or Luther’s refrain: We are saved by faith alone, but not by a faith that is alone. Or James: Faith without works is dead.

But ours is a man-centered age. We like books on how to be a good father or how to improve your diet, rather than how to be holy and Christ-like. And in our circles, we can get caught up with theological issues and miss the point that the goal of all theology is to drive us into a holiness of life. R. Murray Mc’Chenye’s great statement has been noted: “My people’s greatest need is my personal holiness.” This is serious business because without holiness, the author of Hebrews tells us, no one will see the Lord.

Ligonier National Conference – Q&A Session III – Dr. Donald Carson, Dr. Derek Thomas, Dr. Robert Godfrey, Rev. Thabiti Anyabwile

3. What are the challenges associated with holiness (or the lack of it) in the church today?

We need to expect suffering. Growth in holiness is a matter of the heart but also external forces in the church. There has been a decline in honoring a day for the Lord, and thus a decline in time for the Lord, and thus a lack of personal holiness. Godfrey exhorted churches to have Sunday morning and evening services. Anyabwile noted that our union with Christ gives us motivation for holiness.

Carson: We haven’t concentrated on God and the gospel, that’s why we don’t have enough holiness. Everything is tied to that. Don’t think about it only in terms of “not doing stuff” or “doing stuff,” and that reduces to moralism. The law cannot save, although there is a place for law.

Ligonier National Conference – R.C. Sproul (II) – A Consuming Fire: Holiness, Wrath and Justice

The imagery employed in Jonathan Edwards’ famous sermon Sinners In The Hands of An Angry God. In that sermon, he employed numerous metaphors, all of which had Scriptural origin. One of them is that of a dam breaking. People are storing up wrath against the day of wrath. And another is of a spider’s web, holding sinners up by a single thread. And that single thread is held by the hand of God. We rightly remember the sermon’s topic as the wrath of God. But even moreso it is a sermon about the grace of God–holding people up from the pit, and preventing their immediate destruction.

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Challies – The Holiness of God Conference

Tim Challies has been live blogging The Holiness of God Conference. Here are the posts available so far.

Ligonier Conference – Al Mohler – John Calvin: Preacher and Teacher

Calvin understood the majesty of preaching because he understood the majesty of God. Calvin’s mode of preaching was verse-by-verse, book-by-book so he would not selectively avoid things he did not wish to teach. In this way God’s people receive all that they need and not just what the preacher determines the people need. The preacher is neither to add nor subtract from Scripture.

Ligonier Conference – Sinclair Ferguson – The Doctrines of Grace

Calvin says there is no such thing as grace, only Jesus Christ. There is not something outside of Jesus Christ that the Holy Spirit dispenses to you like a lump sum. There is only Jesus Christ which is why one of the most significant and startling things Calvin says is that all that Christ has done for us is of no value to us unless we get, by faith, Jesus Christ himself. And in just a moment you can see how the whole medieval system with priests and sacraments and sacrifices and saints and Mary was immediately exploded and destroyed. What the Spirit is doing and bringing you into is the same as the Lord Jesus himself. There is nothing between—no pope, no bishops, no sacraments, no priests—only the Holy Spirit bringing you to Jesus who is all your righteousness and all the righteousness you will ever need.

From Calvin we learn this: it is all there for you in Christ, so drink from no other fountain than Christ. We are all, even in our evangelical hearts, liable to sink back into errors that make us think there is something in us that qualifies us, something that Jesus Christ could give me without giving himself and me giving myself to him. This is Calvin: it is all of God, it is all in Christ, it all comes through the Holy Spirit.

Ligonier Conference – Q&A – Dr. Sinclair Ferguson, Dr. Ligon Duncan, Dr. Steven Lawson, Dr. Al Mohler

Where should people start to learn about Calvin?

Ferguson – If you are daunted by the Institutes, begin with The Golden Booklet of the True Christian Life. You will probably find that Calvin is not as daunting as it may seem. If he didn’t know that Packer was going to do it, he probably would have called this book Knowing God.

Lawson – Read his sermons. The preaching of the word is the primary ordinary means of grace. Begin with his sermons on Galatians and Ephesians.

Mohler – Dive into the deep end of the pool by reading the introduction to the Institutes. Even if you need to read them two or three times, read them! It is one of the greatest works of Christian devotional literature ever written.

Ligonier Conference – R.C. Sproul – I Am the Lord, There is No Other

We also need to consider from this text what this God does. He brings the light and the darkness, he brings well-being and calamity. After 9/11 it was unthinkable to the American people that God could have anything to do with calamity. We are people who believe that God can bless a nation but refuse to believe that he can also judge a nation. We believe this because we do not know who God is. The God of popular religion is not holy. This is not the God of Isaiah 45—the God who brings calamity, the God who brings the bear market and the bull market, who pulls kingdoms up and tears kingdoms down. “I will raise you up Cyrus, but I can also tear you right down.”

Ligonier Conference – Alistair Begg – The Breath of the Almighty: The Holy Spirit

The nature of this topic, he said, makes it virtually horizonless. Considerations of any doctrine, but particularly this one, that are not grounded within the controls of the Bible itself, may lead to all kinds of flights of fancy. There has been as much confusion within evangelicalism about the person and work of the Spirit as there has been in any other part of the Bible.

Ligonier Conference – Thabiti Anyabwile – Cosmic Treason: Sin and the Holiness of God

Sin is personal in nature. It is against God himself, provoking his wrath. Sin is apostasy, turning away from God. Our culture teaches that sin is not often against anyone but is just a mistake or a blooper. But this passage makes it clear that our sin does land on something. It lands squarely in the sight of a holy God who will not look upon sin. Our sin is an offense against God, a personal rebellion against him. It not only incites his anger but is also treasonous, rebelling against the rule and love of God. Israel is often called God’s wife. Can you think of a more treasonous act than to declare union with a husband but then to commit adultery with another?

Ligonier Conference – Robert Godfrey – Wounded for Our Transgressions: The Holiness of God and the Cross

Are you beginning to see what it cost Jesus Christ to be the Savior? When we say he is king it sounds good, when we say he is priest it sounds honorable. And he is those things. But the depth of our salvation is to be found in the willingness of Jesus to become a leper for lepers, to become sin for sinners. “Surely he has borne our sickness.” Jesus was not literally a leper, of course, but just as Uzziah the good king was afflicted with leprosy to show the people the sinfulness of sin, so in some sense we have to think of Jesus as a leper to realize the depths of what it meant for him to take our sins upon himself. We can make this sound like an easy transaction. How hard can sin-bearing be for the eternal son of God? We may slip into such an attitude as the cross becomes too familiar. We may begin to lose a sense of the horror of the cross.


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Holiness of God Conference Starts Today

Today starts the Holiness of God Conference Live Webcast of the 2009 National Conference

Note times are Orlando, FL time (Eastern Time)

Also has a Spanish Broadcast

MINI-CONFERENCE:
John Calvin (1509–2009) — Celebrating a Legacy
In 2009, we celebrate the 500th birthday of John Calvin. It is only appropriate at this time to reflect on his legacy. In the mini-conference, four participants will discuss Calvin’s impact in several aspects of the church’s life and thought. There will be four lectures followed by a Question & Answer time:

1. R. Albert Mohler – John Calvin: Preacher and Teacher
(Thursday, March 19, 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.)
John Calvin was one of the most important figures in the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Today, five hundred years after his birth, his influence continues to be felt. In this message, Dr. Mohler will reflect on the life and work of Calvin, focusing in particular on his role as a preacher and teacher of the Word.

2. Ligon Duncan – Calvin and the Christian Life
(Thursday, March 19, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.)
John Calvin is sometimes perceived as a dry and dusty academic whose writings deal only with abstract theological topics. To read Calvin, however, is to read one who was devoted to seeing God’s Word impact the lives of Christian people everywhere. In this message, Ligon Duncan will explore some of Calvin’s most practical wisdom for those who seek to follow Christ.

3. Sinclair Ferguson – The Doctrines of Grace
(Thursday, March 19, 1:15 – 2:00 p.m.)
Much of the significance of the Protestant Reformers such as John Calvin is found in their rediscovery of the biblical doctrines of grace. After having been buried for centuries under unbiblical doctrines and traditions, their rediscovery and proclamation turned Europe upside down. In this message, Dr. Ferguson will look at Calvin’s formulation of these crucial doctrines and explain why they are no less significant today.

4. Steven J. Lawson – The Legacy of John Calvin
(Thursday, March 19, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.)
The modern history of the church and of the world would be entirely different without John Calvin. The influence of his thought has been felt not only in the teaching and worship of the church, but also within politics, economics, and the wider culture. In this message, Dr. Lawson will look at the legacy of Calvin, explaining what we can learn from him today.

Questions and Answers
(Thursday, March 19, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m.)
Dr. Sinclair Ferguson, Dr. Ligon Duncan, Dr. Steven Lawson, Dr. Al Mohler

——————————————————————————

MAIN SESSIONS:
The Holiness of God
The angels declare that God is “Holy, Holy, Holy.” Without a proper grasp of God’s holiness we do not understand who He truly is, nor do we understand who we truly are. Once we begin to grasp the true meaning of God’s holiness, our lives and our worship will be forever changed. In this conference, prominent Reformed Christian teachers will expound and reflect upon what the Bible says about God’s holiness and ours. The main sessions will consist of eleven lectures:

1. R.C. Sproul – I Am the Lord, There is No Other
(Thursday, March 19, 6:40 – 7:30 p.m.)
Before he discovered the Gospel, contemplation of God’s holiness and his own sinfulness drove Martin Luther to despair. What did he grasp about holiness that most of us do not? In this lecture, Dr. Sproul will introduce the topic of the conference by explaining the meaning of the biblical concept of holiness.

2. R.C. Sproul, Jr. – Train Up Your Children: Family Worship of the Holy God
(Thursday, March 19, 7:30 – 8:30 p.m.)
The worship of our sovereign God is not to be relegated to a mere hour or two each Sunday. Instead, our worship of Him should pervade every aspect of our lives. In this lecture, Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. will exhort believers to worship God as a family, providing encouragement and practical instruction.

3. Sinclair Ferguson – Hallowed Be Your Name: The Holiness of the Father
(Friday, March 20, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.)
In the Lord’s Prayer, Jesus instructed His disciples to acknowledge the Father’s holiness and to adore Him in their every prayer. He is the one whom the seraphim adore, singing, “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts!” In this lecture, Dr. Ferguson will explore what the Bible teaches us concerning the holiness of our Father in heaven.

4. Steven J. Lawson – The Holy One of God: The Holiness of Jesus
(Friday, March 20, 9:40 – 10:40 a.m.)
The disciples of our Lord Jesus Christ referred to Him as “the Holy One of God.” In doing so, they said something not only about His character, but also about His relationship to the Father. In this lecture, Dr. Lawson will look at what the Bible teaches us about the purity and sinlessness of Christ.

5. Alistair Begg – The Breath of the Almighty: The Holy Spirit
(Friday, March 20, 11:30 a.m. – 12:35 p.m.)
The third person of the Trinity is the Holy Spirit, the one whom Job refers to as “the breath of the Almighty.” His work includes conforming believers to the holy image of Christ. In this lecture, Dr. Begg will look at the person and work of the one person of the Trinity whose very name includes the adjective “holy.”

Questions & Answers
(Friday, March 20, 2:30 – 3:25 p.m.)
Dr. Sinclair Ferguson, Dr. Steven Lawson, Dr. Alistair Begg, Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. Moderated by R.C. Sproul

6. Thabiti Anyabwile – Cosmic Treason: Sin and the Holiness of God
(Friday, March 20, 4:05 – 5:05 p.m.)
The sinfulness of sin is not grasped in our day because the holiness of God is not grasped. Sin will only be understood for what it is when God is understood for who He is. In this lecture, Rev. Anyabwile will explain the true sinfulness of sin in the light of the holy and pure character of God.

7. D. A. Carson – A Holy Nation: The Church’s High Calling
(Friday, March 20, 7:15 – 8:00 p.m.)
The history of redemption reveals God calling a people out of the world to be a holy people. In this lecture, Dr. Carson will examine why God has called His people in both the old and new covenants to be a kingdom of priests and a holy nation, and he will explain what this means for us as believers today.

8. Robert Godfrey – Wounded for Our Transgressions: The Holiness of God and the Cross
(Saturday, March 21, 8:30 – 9:40 a.m.)
All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. This is the universal problem faced by all men, a problem requiring a solution man cannot provide. In this lecture, Dr. Godfrey will examine why the holiness of God required an atonement for sin and how Jesus fulfilled that requirement for us.

9. Derek Thomas – Be Ye Holy: The Necessity of Sanctification
(Saturday, March 21, 9:40 – 10:30 a.m.)
According to Scripture, we are justified by faith alone in Jesus Christ alone. Yet our Lord calls those who have been so justified to a life of holiness. In this lecture, Dr. Thomas will explain the importance and necessity of individual sanctification as well as the means God has provided for it.

Questions & Answers
(Saturday, March 21, 11:25 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.)
Dr. Donald Carson, Dr. Derek Thomas, Dr. Robert Godfrey, Rev. Thabiti Anyabwile Moderated by Dr. R.C. Sproul

10. R.C. Sproul – A Consuming Fire: Holiness, Wrath, and Justice
(Saturday, March 21, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.)
There have always been those who have argued that a truly holy God could not or would not consign anyone to eternal punishment. Such, they say, is inconsistent with God’s love. In this lecture, Dr. Sproul will explain why the holiness of God is not inconsistent with eternal punishment of sin, but in fact requires it.

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2009 National Conference – The Holiness Of God

the-holiness-of-god-conference

National Conference, March 19-21 (2009)

Conference Theme: The Holiness of God. This is an expanded conference with more speakers than ever (Anyabwile, Begg, Carson, Duncan, Ferguson, Godfrey, Lawson, Mohler, Sproul Jr., Sproul, Thomas). Holiness is the characteristic of God’s nature that is at the very core of His being. Without a proper grasp of God’s holiness we do not understand who He truly is, nor do we understand who we truly are. In our pre-conference seminar, we celebrate the 500th birthday of John Calvin.

Live Webcast of the 2009 National Conference

The biggest event of the year for Ligonier Ministries is just around the corner. We are excited to once again be able to offer a free, live webcast of the conference, available in both English and Spanish. See below for details.

While there is nothing quite like being able to attend the conference in person, the live webcast is a helpful way to serve those unable to travel or those living overseas. In the past, we’ve had up to 22,000 people around the world sharing the experience through the webcast. This ministry outreach helps fulfill our desire to “awaken as many people as possible to the holiness of God by proclaiming, teaching, and defending His holiness in all its fullness.” Spread the word and enjoy.

Click here to sign-up

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True Church Conference 2009


February 19th through February 22nd

Muscle Shoals, AL at Grace Life Church of the Shoals

Preachers


Voddie Baucham
is an author, Bible teacher, professor, and pastor. He currently serves as Pastor of Preaching at Grace Family Baptist Church in Spring, Texas. He is also an adjunct professor at The College of Biblical Studies in Houston, Texas, and Union University in Jackson, Tennessee. Dr. Baucham’s own postgraduate study focused on Cultural Apologetics. He is the author of The Ever-Loving Truth, Family Driven Faith, and (soon to be released) What He Must Be:…If He Wants to Marry My Daughter. Dr. Baucham contributed to the book, The Supremacy of Christ in a Postmodern World, by John Piper & Justin Taylor.


Conrad Mbewe
is widely regarded as the African Spurgeon. He faithfully proclaims the Word of God in Zambia from Kabwata Baptist Church where he has pastored for more than 20 years. KBC is presently overseeing the establishment of ten new Reformed churches in Zambia and Botswana. Conrad is the editor of Reformation Zambia magazine and writes three columns in two weekly national newspapers. His most recent contribution to a book is found in Dear Timothy—Letters on Pastoral Ministry, published by Founders Press. He is also the principal of the Reformed Baptist Preachers College in Zambia


David Miller
has been preaching for 43 years. He pastored for five years before serving as Director of Missions for Little Red River Baptist Association (Arkansas), a position he held for 25 years. An itinerant preacher, David has been in full-time evangelism (Line Upon Line Ministries) since 1995. He served on the Board of Trustees of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, for eight years. He currently prefers the title “Country Preacher-at-Large.”


JONATHAN SIMS
is a passionate, expositional Bible preacher who has pastored in three Baptist churches in Texas, Alabama, and Tennessee. Jonathan is a native of Alabama and holds a Masters of Divinity from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has served for ten years as the pastor of Shelbyville Mills Baptist Church in Shelbyville, Tennessee, where he preaches and implements the Word of God. He is currently preaching verse-by-verse through the book of Matthew.


Paul Washer
ministered as a missionary to Peru for 10 years, during which time he founded the HeartCry Missionary Society to support Peruvian church planters. HeartCry’s work now supports indigenous missionaries in Eastern Europe, South America, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. An itinerant preacher, Paul also teaches young ministers at his home church, Grace Life Church of the Shoals. He is the author of The One True God: A Biblical Study of the Doctrine of God and The Truth About Man: A Biblical Study of the Doctrine of Man.

Jeff Noblit
is the Senior Pastor-Teacher of Grace Life Church of the Shoals. He has served on the pastoral staff for 27 years, the last 20 as senior pastor. Jeff is the founder of Anchored in Truth Ministries, an expository preaching ministry, and is the author of The Accountability Notebook and the witnessing booklet, The Great Answer to the Great Question. He has written articles for various magazines and journals and has contributed to the book, Calvinism: A Southern Baptist Dialogue.
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