Tag Archive | Love

What Is Real Love?

A few months ago I was asked “What is love?”  The point being what is real love beyond the emotional response.

We have a very good picture of love in the Bible in the person of Christ.

John 3:16 (ESV) “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.

Romans 5:7-8 (ESV)

7 For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die—
8 but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

1 John 4:10 (ESV) In this is love, not that we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.

Then in 1 Corinthians 13 we have a very good description of love.

1 Corinthians 13:4-8 (ESV)

4 Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant

5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;

6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth.

7 Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

8 Love never ends.

But this video is a very good example of love.

 

Imagine if all love was displayed so selflessly!

This is love.  The desire to love and serve another for 50 years or more no matter what may happen or whether they are able to return the love or benefit you in anyway.  Just because Christ loved you in such a manner.


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The Love Dare

The Love Dare by Alex & Stephen Kendrick

Free kindle book for a limited time.

Unconditional love is eagerly promised at weddings, but rarely practiced in real life. As a result, romantic hopes are often replaced with disappointment in the home. But it doesn’t have to stay that way.

The Love Dare, the New York Times No. 1 best seller that has sold five million copies and was major plot device in the popular movie Fireproof, is a 40-day challenge for husbands and wives to understand and practice unconditional love. Whether your marriage is hanging by a thread or healthy and strong, The Love Dare is a journey you need to take. It’s time to learn the keys to finding true intimacy and developing a dynamic marriage.

This second edition also features a special link to a free online marriage evaluation, a new preface by Stephen and Alex Kendrick, minor text updates, and select testimonials from The Love Dare readers. Take the dare!


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Irritability

Irritability can occur easily in a large family particularly when people are rushed, tired or even hungry.  I have a couple in my family who when irritability strikes often the quickest solution is to either feed them or put them to bed and I’m not talking about babies. :0  However, irritability is a bigger issue than most realize.  Irritability is sin and a lack of love.

1 Corinthians 13:4-6 (ESV)
4  Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant
5 or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;
6 it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth.

Do You Take Your Irritability Seriously?

Most of us tend to think of irritability as a natural response to life’s little frustrations. We also tend not to worry too much about our irritability, although some Christians may perhaps be wise enough to make it a matter for prayer. When was the last time you asked the Lord to help you respond graciously to that special person who always annoys you?

We should take our irritability much more seriously, because it is the very opposite of love. We know this because 1 Corinthians 13:5 says that love “is not irritable.” Irritability is the antithesis of charity. It is not merely a way of complaining, therefore, but actually a way of hating.

Ryken uses Mark 6:30-44 to show how Jesus dealt with a situation that irritated the disciples. Understanding the anatomy of irritability can help us battle it. … Continue reading.

We will have the opportunity this week to work on dealing with some irritability. Character Development 101.


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That’s Bunken – Ravenhill

“I don’t believe there is a man on the whole TV that preaches salvation. They preach forgiveness. Forgiveness is not salvation. …  “Oh you know the Lord loves you just as you are.” Well then why get changed? Commit adultery as much as you like. He still loves you. Be a cheat, be a liar, be a thief, and be a failure. He still loves you. But there’s a scripture. Isn’t it the Psalms 7…. where it says “God is angry with the wicked every day.” I heard somebody quote today “God loves you but hates your sin” that’s bunken. God hates you for committing the sin. Is God going to take your sins and judge them at the Judgment and leave you alone?”

~~~~~~~~~~

Leonard Ravenhill.


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God Hates Sin but Loves Sinners – D.A. Carson

THE DIFFICULT DOCTRINE OF THE LOVE OF GOD by D.A. Carson

One evangelical cliché has it that God hates the sin but loves the sinner. There is a small element of truth in these words: God has nothing but hate for the sin, but it would be wrong to conclude that God has nothing but hate for the sinner. A difference must be maintained between God’s view of sin and his view of the sinner. Nevertheless the cliché (God hates the sin but loves the sinner) is false on the face of it and should be abandoned. Fourteen times in the first fifty psalms alone, we are told that God hates the sinner, his wrath is on the liar, and so forth. In the Bible, the wrath of God rests both on the sin (Rom. 1:18ff.) and on the sinner (John 3:36).

Our problem, in part, is that in human experience wrath and love normally abide in mutually exclusive compartments. Love drives wrath out, or wrath drives love out. We come closest to bringing them together, perhaps, in our responses to a wayward act by one of our children, but normally we do not think that a wrathful person is loving.

But this is not the way it is with God. God’s wrath is not an implacable, blind rage. However emotional it may be, it is an entirely reasonable and willed response to offenses against his holiness. But his love, as we saw in the last chapter, wells up amidst his perfections and is not generated by the loveliness of the loved. Thus there is nothing intrinsically impossible about wrath and love being directed toward the same individual or people at the same time. God in his perfections must be wrathful against his rebel image-bearers, for they have offended him; God in his perfections must be loving toward his rebel image-bearers, for he is that kind of God.

Love – D.A. Carson  Pages 646–50 in New Dictionary of Biblical Theology.

The thesis that God hates sin but loves sinners

There is a small element of truth in this thesis. God always hates sin; he is invariably and implacably opposed to it. And it is true that God loves sinners: God “demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom. 5:8; cf. John 3:16).  Nevertheless the thesis, with its simplistic antithesis between the personal sinner and sin in the abstract, is mistaken. The same apostle who declares that God’s wrath is revealed from heaven against “all the godlessness and wickedness of men” (Rom. 1:18) also speaks of God’s wrath against individuals (2:5); indeed we are all “by nature children of wrath” (NRSV). The first fifty Psalms repeatedly describe the kinds of people on whom God’s wrath rests, not just the kinds of sin. Indeed, the language can move from God’s wrath to God’s hate and abhorrence: “The arrogant cannot stand in your presence; you hate all who do wrong. You destroy those who tell lies; bloodthirsty and deceitful men the Lord abhors” (Ps. 5:5–6, NIV).

None of this means that God’s wrath is arbitrary or whimsical. In Scripture, God’s wrath, however affective, is the willed and righteous response of his holiness to sin. God’s holiness, like God’s love, is intrinsic to the very being of God; his wrath is not. To put the point another way: God has always been holy, as he has always been love; he has not always been wrathful. But where his holiness confronts the rebellion of his creatures, he must be wrathful (and the entire sweep of the Bible’s storyline insists he is), or his holiness is anaemic. Yet for all that he is no less the God of love.

 

 


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Forgiveness of Sinners – Jay Adams

To say God forgives sin is true. But in saying it that way, we must never lose sight of the fact that it is sinners from whom the liability of guilt is lifted. God punishes persons and He forgives persons. Some try to distinguish between sin and the sinner: “God hates sin; loves the sinner.” Such separation isn’t possible. God sends sinners to hell; they, not their sin, are punished eternally. Christ, not the sin He bore, suffered and died on the cross.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jay Adams, from The Basis for Forgiveness

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God’s Love for Believers

In contemplating the expression “God loves the sinner, but hates the sin”, we’ve seen that God hates not only the sin but sinners, that the expression isn’t from the Bible just quotes from others, and the sin cannot be separated from the sinner.  So where does that leave those who believe on Christ for salvation?

The problem with using such a trite expression is what happens often when people attempt to evangelize.  It leaves out the gospel and Christ.  Just as “God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life”, leaves out Christ and the gospel.  We cannot leave out the gospel and Christ.  It would be like throwing out a rope to a drowning person and forgetting to hold the other end of the rope.  It may make the drowning person feel better for a while but it won’t help in the long run.

Ever participated in a typical youth group activity where the youth are told to write out on pieces of paper their sins.  Then they are told to nail their sins to a large wooden cross.  Sounds all nice and encouraging, right?  A way for youth to visualize Christ taking their sins because He loves them so much.  But it is flawed, just like the expression above is flawed.  See what was crucified on that Cross of Calvary was not just our sins but also us.  The sins Christ bore were not what was crucified but Christ Himself was crucified.  You cannot separate the sins from the sinner.

Gal 2:20-21 (ESV)  I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

We were crucified with Christ, not just our sins.  We died and were raised again as new creations.  It is no longer us who live but Christ in us.

2 Corinthians 5:17 (ESV) Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

We are accepted due to Christ (blessed in the ESV).

Ephesians 1:6 (KJV) To the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.

Our sins are atoned for.  We are justified by Christ.  We are reconciled with God.  We are at peace with God.  We are loved.

Romans 5:7-11 (ESV) 7 For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die— 8 but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. 9 Since, therefore, we have now been justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God. 10 For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life. 11 More than that, we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.

1 Corinthians 6:9-11 (ESV) 9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

Romans 5:1 (ESV) Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

John 15:9 (ESV)  As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Abide in my love.

But what if we sin after we have been justified? Not only are we new creations, Christ is continually interceding for us with the Father.

Romans 8:34 (ESV) Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died—more than that, who was raised— who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us.

Hebrews 7:25 (ESV) Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them.


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Can the Sin Be Separated From The Sinner?

Is it possible to separate the sin from the sinner?  See it sounds nice to say “God loves the sinner, but hates the sin.” But is it possible? Yes and no. Don’t you hate answers like that? However, if you are a believer you shouldn’t.

Sin cannot be separated from a sinner.  Sin only exists in theory until there is an entity to commit sin.  God created the world and all that was in it.  He declared it was good, even then though the idea or concept of sin existed.  Remember that Christ was slain before the foundation of the world and the names were written in the Book of Life (Rev 13:8).  So the concept of sin and evil existed from the foundation of the world, otherwise there would have been no need for the slain Christ.  When Satan and his angels of darkness rebelled then sin was encompassed in a being.  When Adam and Eve sinned in the Garden, they became sinners.

What was cursed as a result of sin?  Sin itself was not cursed and punished, but the sinners.  Satan and his Angels were cast out of Heaven.  Adam and Eve were cursed and cast from the Garden.  Sin cannot be punished only, sinners can be punished.  Sin is not what is sent to Hell at the last day, sinners are.

Everyone would say they hate the sin of murder.  We can discuss the fine points about why murder is wrong whether based on Scripture or not.  However, when it comes down to a murder being committed murder is not what is on trial. The person who murdered is on trial. It is a person who will be punished for the sin of murder.  He is a murderer; you cannot separate the murder from the murderer.  Even after serving time in prison and “paying back society” he can be released but it will not take away the fact that he is a murderer. He can even repent, ask forgiveness and be forgiven by society yet he is still a murderer.

So where does this leave believers if God not only hates sin but also hates sinners?  Does God love us or hate us?  See even believers still sin so what is our hope? How do you reconcile that with God loved us while still sinners (Romans 5:8)?

 


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So Where Does That Expression Come From?

While looking at the expression “God loves you, but hates your sin”, we’ve seen that it isn’t a quote from the Bible and also that God Himself says He hates sinners  and not just the sin. So where does the idea of “God loves you, but hates your sin” originate? For something that is quoted so often you would think people would know where it originated. But most don’t. Does it matter who said it? Even whether or not it is true? I think it does. See if I found that Charles Spurgeon was to be credited with saying it then I would lend it more credence than if say Benny Hinn was quoted as having first said it. Not that Spurgeon is always right, but He does get more benefit of the doubt than a false teacher would. But then I would even check up on Spurgeon and see if it could be backed by Scripture. I know it is a radical concept but I would throw out even a Spurgeon quote if it didn’t stand up to Scripture.

The earliest person to be attributed with saying something similar to “God loves you, but hates your sin” is St. Augustine of Hippo.  St. Augustine was Bishop of Hippo from 395 – 430 A.D. In a letter (Opera Omnia, vol II. col. 962, letter 211 ) St. Augustine wrote, he is reported to have said “With love for mankind and hatred of sins.” That is a similar statement but it isn’t in context. Is it attributed to God saying it or is Augustine himself saying it? That I couldn’t find out. And it matters greatly!

Another quote from Augustine:

“It is clear, then, that the man who does not live according to man but according to God must be a lover of the good and therefore a hater of evil; since no man is wicked by nature but is wicked only by some defect, a man who lives according to God owes it to the wicked men that his hatred be perfect, so that, neither hating the man because of his corruption nor loving the corruption because of the man, he should hate the sin but love the sinner. For, once the corruption has been cured, then all that is left should be loved and nothing remains to be hated.”

-Augustine, City of God, p. 304

This appears to be saying that a “man” should love the sinner and hate the sin. That is a big difference than God saying He loves the sinner but hates the sin. But notice also Augustine says “no man is wicked by nature but is wicked only by some defect”. I would say Scripture teaches that our nature is wicked from conception. We are sinners from the beginning, not just because we sin.

The next person who is attributed as saying something similar to “God loves you, but hates your sin” is Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi from his autobiography, The Story of My Experiments with Truth:

“Whereas a good deed should call forth approbation and a wicked deed disapprobation, the doer of the deed, whether good or wicked, always deserves respect or pity as the case may be. ’Hate the sin and not the sinner’ is a precept which, though easy enough to understand, is rarely practiced, and that is why the poison of hatred spreads in the world.”

I won’t bother explaining why Gandhi, a Hindu, is not someone whom a Christian should accept as worthy of quoting and holding up as a virtuous. For more info on Hinduism see CARM.

God loves you, but hates your sin.

• We don’t have this expression found in the Bible.

• We have direct quotes from Scripture that God hates sinners, ex. Psalm 5:5.

• This quote is quite different than the quotes it appears to be derived from. Since none of them appear to attribute it to God.

So what do we do with this?

Can sin be separated from the sinner?

 


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