Tag Archive | Sin

Complaining

Heard recently:

Complaining – That’s just life.

Actually it should be:

Complaining – That’s just sin.

Philippians 2:14 Do all things without murmurings and disputings: 15 That ye may be blameless and harmless, the sons of God, without rebuke, in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation, among whom ye shine as lights in the world;


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No Condemnation – Spurgeon

We are today accepted in the Beloved, absolved from sin, acquitted at the bar of God.  …

We are now-even now pardoned; even now are our sins put away; even now we stand in the sight of God accepted, as though we had never been guilty. “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus.” There is not a sin in the Book of God, even now, against one of His people. Who dareth to lay anything to their charge? There is neither speck, nor spot, nor wrinkle, nor any such thing remaining upon any one believer in the matter of justification in the sight of the Judge of all the earth.

Charles H. Spurgeon


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Tears

“All the tears of a penitent sinner, should he shed as many as there have been fallen drops of rain since the creation, cannot wash away one sin.  The everlasting burnings in hell cannot purify  the flaming conscience from the least sin.”

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John Flavel


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Jesus Became Sin – Paul Washer

Deep South Founders Conference

Session 7 – Saturday Morning Service – January 14, 2012

Paul Washer

Jesus Became Sin

2 Corinthians 5:21

The fact that God became flesh is horrendous. But it did not end there. God became sin. He who knew no sin became sin on our behalf. It is not that Jesus was corrupted or defiled or impure. Jesus’s righteousness was imputed to us because our sins were imputed to Him. There is a legal declaration of righteousness and a practical declaration of righteousness – God treats us as He treats His Son Jesus Christ – being right with Him. God both legally declared Jesus guilty and God treated Him as guilty.

Jesus knew no sin. We have never loved God as God ought to be loved. There was never a moment that Jesus did not love God as He should be loved. We can say the same with obedience. We are cursed because we have not done all the things written in the law (Galatians 3:10). Jesus completely obeyed and fulfilled the law.  But then Jesus bore the curse for us (Galatians 3:13). Turn the beatitudes upside-down and you have defined the curse that belongs to us but were thrown upon Christ.

The blessings and curses from Mount Gerazim and Mount Ebal are a picture of what happened on the cross of Calvary. Jesus Christ was the covenant keeper. We are the covenant breakers. But the curses were taken by Jesus and the blessings fall upon us. God crushed His only-begotten Son on the cross of Calvary. This is the bridge between Mount Gerazim and Mount Ebal.

How can God bless the wicked? How can God be just and the justifier? How can God deal mercifully with Adam, Noah, Abraham, David? Because of Jesus Christ on Calvary. Because Jesus Christ was cursed for them, for me, on Calvary. Jesus Christ took full responsibility for them and for me. This gives a whole new meaning to the command to take up our cross and follow Jesus. It is what happened to Jesus in prayer in the garden of Gethsemane. Jesus did not sweat drops of blood and pray that the cup be taken away from Him because of the physical act of crucifixion. It was because He had to bear the curse of all His people and the wrath of Almighty God.

Jehovah Jireh – God will provide. Not a new house, not a new car. God will provide a Savior. God showed His love for me when He did not withhold His Son, His only Son, from me.

Audio:

The Doctrine of Man – Part 3 by Paul Washer

 


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That’s Bunken – Ravenhill

“I don’t believe there is a man on the whole TV that preaches salvation. They preach forgiveness. Forgiveness is not salvation. …  “Oh you know the Lord loves you just as you are.” Well then why get changed? Commit adultery as much as you like. He still loves you. Be a cheat, be a liar, be a thief, and be a failure. He still loves you. But there’s a scripture. Isn’t it the Psalms 7…. where it says “God is angry with the wicked every day.” I heard somebody quote today “God loves you but hates your sin” that’s bunken. God hates you for committing the sin. Is God going to take your sins and judge them at the Judgment and leave you alone?”

~~~~~~~~~~

Leonard Ravenhill.


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Forgiveness of Sinners – Jay Adams

To say God forgives sin is true. But in saying it that way, we must never lose sight of the fact that it is sinners from whom the liability of guilt is lifted. God punishes persons and He forgives persons. Some try to distinguish between sin and the sinner: “God hates sin; loves the sinner.” Such separation isn’t possible. God sends sinners to hell; they, not their sin, are punished eternally. Christ, not the sin He bore, suffered and died on the cross.

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Jay Adams, from The Basis for Forgiveness

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God’s Love for Believers

In contemplating the expression “God loves the sinner, but hates the sin”, we’ve seen that God hates not only the sin but sinners, that the expression isn’t from the Bible just quotes from others, and the sin cannot be separated from the sinner.  So where does that leave those who believe on Christ for salvation?

The problem with using such a trite expression is what happens often when people attempt to evangelize.  It leaves out the gospel and Christ.  Just as “God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life”, leaves out Christ and the gospel.  We cannot leave out the gospel and Christ.  It would be like throwing out a rope to a drowning person and forgetting to hold the other end of the rope.  It may make the drowning person feel better for a while but it won’t help in the long run.

Ever participated in a typical youth group activity where the youth are told to write out on pieces of paper their sins.  Then they are told to nail their sins to a large wooden cross.  Sounds all nice and encouraging, right?  A way for youth to visualize Christ taking their sins because He loves them so much.  But it is flawed, just like the expression above is flawed.  See what was crucified on that Cross of Calvary was not just our sins but also us.  The sins Christ bore were not what was crucified but Christ Himself was crucified.  You cannot separate the sins from the sinner.

Gal 2:20-21 (ESV)  I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

We were crucified with Christ, not just our sins.  We died and were raised again as new creations.  It is no longer us who live but Christ in us.

2 Corinthians 5:17 (ESV) Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come.

We are accepted due to Christ (blessed in the ESV).

Ephesians 1:6 (KJV) To the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.

Our sins are atoned for.  We are justified by Christ.  We are reconciled with God.  We are at peace with God.  We are loved.

Romans 5:7-11 (ESV) 7 For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die— 8 but God shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. 9 Since, therefore, we have now been justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God. 10 For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life. 11 More than that, we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.

1 Corinthians 6:9-11 (ESV) 9 Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, 10 nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God.

Romans 5:1 (ESV) Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.

John 15:9 (ESV)  As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Abide in my love.

But what if we sin after we have been justified? Not only are we new creations, Christ is continually interceding for us with the Father.

Romans 8:34 (ESV) Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died—more than that, who was raised— who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us.

Hebrews 7:25 (ESV) Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them.


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Can the Sin Be Separated From The Sinner?

Is it possible to separate the sin from the sinner?  See it sounds nice to say “God loves the sinner, but hates the sin.” But is it possible? Yes and no. Don’t you hate answers like that? However, if you are a believer you shouldn’t.

Sin cannot be separated from a sinner.  Sin only exists in theory until there is an entity to commit sin.  God created the world and all that was in it.  He declared it was good, even then though the idea or concept of sin existed.  Remember that Christ was slain before the foundation of the world and the names were written in the Book of Life (Rev 13:8).  So the concept of sin and evil existed from the foundation of the world, otherwise there would have been no need for the slain Christ.  When Satan and his angels of darkness rebelled then sin was encompassed in a being.  When Adam and Eve sinned in the Garden, they became sinners.

What was cursed as a result of sin?  Sin itself was not cursed and punished, but the sinners.  Satan and his Angels were cast out of Heaven.  Adam and Eve were cursed and cast from the Garden.  Sin cannot be punished only, sinners can be punished.  Sin is not what is sent to Hell at the last day, sinners are.

Everyone would say they hate the sin of murder.  We can discuss the fine points about why murder is wrong whether based on Scripture or not.  However, when it comes down to a murder being committed murder is not what is on trial. The person who murdered is on trial. It is a person who will be punished for the sin of murder.  He is a murderer; you cannot separate the murder from the murderer.  Even after serving time in prison and “paying back society” he can be released but it will not take away the fact that he is a murderer. He can even repent, ask forgiveness and be forgiven by society yet he is still a murderer.

So where does this leave believers if God not only hates sin but also hates sinners?  Does God love us or hate us?  See even believers still sin so what is our hope? How do you reconcile that with God loved us while still sinners (Romans 5:8)?

 


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So Where Does That Expression Come From?

While looking at the expression “God loves you, but hates your sin”, we’ve seen that it isn’t a quote from the Bible and also that God Himself says He hates sinners  and not just the sin. So where does the idea of “God loves you, but hates your sin” originate? For something that is quoted so often you would think people would know where it originated. But most don’t. Does it matter who said it? Even whether or not it is true? I think it does. See if I found that Charles Spurgeon was to be credited with saying it then I would lend it more credence than if say Benny Hinn was quoted as having first said it. Not that Spurgeon is always right, but He does get more benefit of the doubt than a false teacher would. But then I would even check up on Spurgeon and see if it could be backed by Scripture. I know it is a radical concept but I would throw out even a Spurgeon quote if it didn’t stand up to Scripture.

The earliest person to be attributed with saying something similar to “God loves you, but hates your sin” is St. Augustine of Hippo.  St. Augustine was Bishop of Hippo from 395 – 430 A.D. In a letter (Opera Omnia, vol II. col. 962, letter 211 ) St. Augustine wrote, he is reported to have said “With love for mankind and hatred of sins.” That is a similar statement but it isn’t in context. Is it attributed to God saying it or is Augustine himself saying it? That I couldn’t find out. And it matters greatly!

Another quote from Augustine:

“It is clear, then, that the man who does not live according to man but according to God must be a lover of the good and therefore a hater of evil; since no man is wicked by nature but is wicked only by some defect, a man who lives according to God owes it to the wicked men that his hatred be perfect, so that, neither hating the man because of his corruption nor loving the corruption because of the man, he should hate the sin but love the sinner. For, once the corruption has been cured, then all that is left should be loved and nothing remains to be hated.”

-Augustine, City of God, p. 304

This appears to be saying that a “man” should love the sinner and hate the sin. That is a big difference than God saying He loves the sinner but hates the sin. But notice also Augustine says “no man is wicked by nature but is wicked only by some defect”. I would say Scripture teaches that our nature is wicked from conception. We are sinners from the beginning, not just because we sin.

The next person who is attributed as saying something similar to “God loves you, but hates your sin” is Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi from his autobiography, The Story of My Experiments with Truth:

“Whereas a good deed should call forth approbation and a wicked deed disapprobation, the doer of the deed, whether good or wicked, always deserves respect or pity as the case may be. ’Hate the sin and not the sinner’ is a precept which, though easy enough to understand, is rarely practiced, and that is why the poison of hatred spreads in the world.”

I won’t bother explaining why Gandhi, a Hindu, is not someone whom a Christian should accept as worthy of quoting and holding up as a virtuous. For more info on Hinduism see CARM.

God loves you, but hates your sin.

• We don’t have this expression found in the Bible.

• We have direct quotes from Scripture that God hates sinners, ex. Psalm 5:5.

• This quote is quite different than the quotes it appears to be derived from. Since none of them appear to attribute it to God.

So what do we do with this?

Can sin be separated from the sinner?

 


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