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Drawing Near to the Heart of God: Encouragement for Your Lifetime Journey

Drawing Near to the Heart of God: Encouragement for Your Lifetime Journey – free kindle version

by Cynthia Heald

Best-selling Bible teacher and Navigator author Cynthia Heald prepares women for the most fulfilling journey they’ll ever go on–walking with God through life. By offering Scriptural insights and questions to stimulate introspection and journaling, Cynthia engages with you on a new, personal level.

Through classic devotional readings and personal stories, this guide shows that life is a process filled with the struggles and joys of walking with God.

Learn to reflect on where you are now, where you’d like to be, and how far you’ve already come.


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God’s Math

God’s math is not like our math.

Otherwise you wouldn’t have this:

Jesus is 100% God and 100% man.

God is 100% Sovereign and man is 100% responsible.

God the Father plus Jesus the Son plus the Holy Spirit equals One God.

The Good Shepherd leaves the 99 sheep to find the one lost sheep. (Luke 15:3-7)

A Handful of Flour and a Little Oil equal many days meals for a household and never runs out. (1 Kings 17:8-16)

One jar of oil plus many vessels equal paid debts.  (2 Kings 4:1-7)

Five loaves and two fishes fed 5000. (Luke 9:12-17)

They just don’t add up in our limited human minds.


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God Is Good

God is Great, God is Good
Let us thank Him for our food

More theology in that simple prayer than most realize.

Psalms 73:1 (ESV) Truly God is good to Israel, to those who are pure in heart.

Psalms 107:1 (ESV)  Oh give thanks to the Lord,  for he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever!

Psalm 135:3 (ESV) Praise the Lord, for the Lord is good; sing to his name, for it is pleasant!

1 Timothy 4:4-5  (ESV)
4 For everything created by God is good, and nothing is to be rejected if it is received with thanksgiving,
5 for it is made holy by the word of God and prayer.

God is good in all things and in all ways. He is good in himself; indeed, he is goodness itself. His wisdom is good. His knowledge is good. His judgments are good. His power is good. His works are all good. When God was creating the universe he said after each step of his creation, “It is good” (Gen. 1:4, 10, 12, 18, 21, 25, 31). And so it was! Nothing God did could have been done better.

God’s thoughts toward us are good. It was good that he loved us and chose us in Christ before the foundation of the world. The way he chose to save us was good. It was good that he sent Jesus at the appointed time to be our Savior. It was good that he called us to faith in Jesus by the power of his Holy Spirit. It is good that he has called us to fellowship with himself and with one another in the church. God’s ways with us are good.

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James Boyce, Commentary on The Psalms Volumes 1, 2, 3


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Evil – Jay Adams

All evil is according to His determinate purposes—always for some good purpose. God doesn’t allow evil; He has planned all good and evil. Actually, all the “evil” we talk about today is actually a good that we shall someday see to be such. God doesn’t allow it—He foreordains it.

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Jay Adams from Evil

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The Holiness of God

The Holiness of God – Free Kindle Book

by R.C. Sproul

 

Ligonier

“When people ask me to name the Ligonier teaching material they should use to help them grow; I tell them, ‘You should start with The Holiness of God.’”
—R.C. Sproul

Now celebrating 25 years of publication, this classic can help you better understand the biblical picture of God’s awesome holiness and why it is so foundational to God-centered, God-honoring theology and Christian living. In The Holiness of God , R.C. Sproul demonstrates that encountering God’s holy presence is a terrifying experience. Dr. Sproul argues that this struggle is nonetheless necessary because it is the only way to cure our propensity to trust in ourselves and our own righteousness for salvation.


“This book is a game-changer! Everything in our lives and ministries begins and ends with a soul-gripping awareness of God’s infinite holiness. These dramatic chapters, written in high-impact fashion, reveal what the holiness of God is and how it should revolutionize our lives.”
—Steven Lawson


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Wise Counsel

Do you seek wise counsel in God’s Word?

Are you listening to the Lord?

Is calamity, terror, storms, distress and anguish your lot for ignoring counsel?

Must the Lord mock you for your disdain of His Word?

Are you dreading disaster?

Proverbs 1:5 (ESV) Let the wise hear and increase in learning, and the one who understands obtain guidance, {or wise counsel (NKJV)}

Proverbs 1:24-27 (ESV)
24 Because I have called and you refused to listen, have stretched out my hand and no one has heeded,
25 because you have ignored all my counsel and would have none of my reproof,
26 I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when terror strikes you,
27 when terror strikes you like a storm and your calamity comes like a whirlwind, when distress and anguish come upon you.

Proverbs 1:29-30 (ESV)
29 Because they hated knowledge and did not choose the fear of the Lord,
30 would have none of my counsel and despised all my reproof,

Proverbs 1:33 (ESV) …but whoever listens to me will dwell secure and will be at ease, without dread of disaster.”


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Hate by Jay Adams

Hate by Jay E Adams

It is commonly taught that “God hates the sin but loves the sinner.” Few ever examine, let alone challenge, that statement. Yet not only do we read of God’s hatred toward evil-doers (“You hate all workers of iniquity” [Ps. 5:5]), but we know that it is upon men, not their sins, that God’s hatred poured His wrath. And it is human beings, not their sins, who will suffer forever in hell. Doesn’t it seem wrong, therefore, to say God hates sin but loves the sinner?

“Well, when you put it that way, yes. I guess so. But that creates problems too.” Of course it does. But we must not assert a falsehood or reject truth merely because doing so raises new problems the error (wrongly) avoided.

Continue reading


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That’s Bunken – Ravenhill

“I don’t believe there is a man on the whole TV that preaches salvation. They preach forgiveness. Forgiveness is not salvation. …  “Oh you know the Lord loves you just as you are.” Well then why get changed? Commit adultery as much as you like. He still loves you. Be a cheat, be a liar, be a thief, and be a failure. He still loves you. But there’s a scripture. Isn’t it the Psalms 7…. where it says “God is angry with the wicked every day.” I heard somebody quote today “God loves you but hates your sin” that’s bunken. God hates you for committing the sin. Is God going to take your sins and judge them at the Judgment and leave you alone?”

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Leonard Ravenhill.


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God Hates Sin but Loves Sinners – D.A. Carson

THE DIFFICULT DOCTRINE OF THE LOVE OF GOD by D.A. Carson

One evangelical cliché has it that God hates the sin but loves the sinner. There is a small element of truth in these words: God has nothing but hate for the sin, but it would be wrong to conclude that God has nothing but hate for the sinner. A difference must be maintained between God’s view of sin and his view of the sinner. Nevertheless the cliché (God hates the sin but loves the sinner) is false on the face of it and should be abandoned. Fourteen times in the first fifty psalms alone, we are told that God hates the sinner, his wrath is on the liar, and so forth. In the Bible, the wrath of God rests both on the sin (Rom. 1:18ff.) and on the sinner (John 3:36).

Our problem, in part, is that in human experience wrath and love normally abide in mutually exclusive compartments. Love drives wrath out, or wrath drives love out. We come closest to bringing them together, perhaps, in our responses to a wayward act by one of our children, but normally we do not think that a wrathful person is loving.

But this is not the way it is with God. God’s wrath is not an implacable, blind rage. However emotional it may be, it is an entirely reasonable and willed response to offenses against his holiness. But his love, as we saw in the last chapter, wells up amidst his perfections and is not generated by the loveliness of the loved. Thus there is nothing intrinsically impossible about wrath and love being directed toward the same individual or people at the same time. God in his perfections must be wrathful against his rebel image-bearers, for they have offended him; God in his perfections must be loving toward his rebel image-bearers, for he is that kind of God.

Love – D.A. Carson  Pages 646–50 in New Dictionary of Biblical Theology.

The thesis that God hates sin but loves sinners

There is a small element of truth in this thesis. God always hates sin; he is invariably and implacably opposed to it. And it is true that God loves sinners: God “demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Rom. 5:8; cf. John 3:16).  Nevertheless the thesis, with its simplistic antithesis between the personal sinner and sin in the abstract, is mistaken. The same apostle who declares that God’s wrath is revealed from heaven against “all the godlessness and wickedness of men” (Rom. 1:18) also speaks of God’s wrath against individuals (2:5); indeed we are all “by nature children of wrath” (NRSV). The first fifty Psalms repeatedly describe the kinds of people on whom God’s wrath rests, not just the kinds of sin. Indeed, the language can move from God’s wrath to God’s hate and abhorrence: “The arrogant cannot stand in your presence; you hate all who do wrong. You destroy those who tell lies; bloodthirsty and deceitful men the Lord abhors” (Ps. 5:5–6, NIV).

None of this means that God’s wrath is arbitrary or whimsical. In Scripture, God’s wrath, however affective, is the willed and righteous response of his holiness to sin. God’s holiness, like God’s love, is intrinsic to the very being of God; his wrath is not. To put the point another way: God has always been holy, as he has always been love; he has not always been wrathful. But where his holiness confronts the rebellion of his creatures, he must be wrathful (and the entire sweep of the Bible’s storyline insists he is), or his holiness is anaemic. Yet for all that he is no less the God of love.

 

 


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